Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Although I've been using Ruby 1.9 for a while, I only recently discovered the newer hash syntax that's now supported:

settings = {
  host: "localhost",
  port: 5984
}

As opposed to:

settings = {
  "host" => "localhost"
}

I like its similarity to JavaScript's object noation, and looks a bit like JSON, so I'll probably switch to using it with all my libraries, but I still want to support other users and my own projects which assume the old syntax.

So it really comes down to a fairly simple question of having to test for both symbols and strings. Is there an easy way to do both of these lines as one?

return true if settings["host"] and settings["db"]

return true if settings[:host] and settings[:db]
share|improve this question
2  
I should note - I'm aware that symbols and strings are distinct for a reason and that I'm really doing pretty different things with those two lines, but for the sake of moving towards the new syntax I'm basically pretending it's all the same. –  Cerales Nov 21 '11 at 23:53
1  
Just expect your users to always use symbols as keys (as they should), like Sean Hill explains. –  Dominik Honnef Nov 22 '11 at 0:13
1  
@dominikh, the new syntax won't even parse on Ruby 1.8. The following is from ree-1.8.7: settings = { host: "localhost" } SyntaxError: compile error (irb):89: odd number list for Hash settings = { host: "localhost" } ^ (irb):89: syntax error, unexpected ':', expecting '}' I think he is confusing two separate issues. 1) String vs Symbol keys and 2) Ruby's new hash syntax. –  Sean Hill Nov 22 '11 at 0:25
    
Uhm, I suppose I misunderstood part of your question then, as I thought it was only about strings vs symbols. If you want to support 1.8.x users, you must not use the new Hash syntax (called hash rockets) in your code. Edit: Well, and that was me confusing two different people :) My two comments still stand though. –  Dominik Honnef Nov 22 '11 at 0:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Even in Ruby < 1.9, you could use symbols for keys. For example:

# Ruby 1.8.7
settings = { :host => "localhost" }
puts settings[:host] #outputs localhost
settings.keys[0].class # => Symbol

Ruby 1.9 changes the way that you create hashes. It takes the key and converts it to a symbol for you, while eliminating the need for a hash rocket.

# Ruby 1.9.2
settings = { host: "localhost" }
settings[:host] # => "localhost"
settings.keys[0].class # => Symbol

In both cases, if I try to access settings[:name] with settings["name"], I'm going to get nil. All Ruby 1.9 does is allow for a new way of creating hashes. To answer your question, you cannot, as far as I know, use the new {key: value} syntax if you want backwards compatibility with Ruby 1.8.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I don't agree that it was always only correct to use symbols as keys in Ruby 1.8 - even if it was conventional. With the new syntax, though, it seems like it's always correct. I think I'll just overload the [] operator on my hash subclasses where compatibility is important. –  Cerales Nov 22 '11 at 1:59
4  
While I generally dislike absolutes, I would say that it was preferred to use symbols because of its memory advantages over using strings. When you create a symbol, on instance is created; whereas when you use a string, a new instance is created ever time. You can see this in action by doing 10.times { puts "hello".object_id; puts :hello.object_id } The object_id of each string changes, but the object_id of the symbol never changes. –  Sean Hill Nov 22 '11 at 2:40

ActiveSupport (from Rails) offers HashWithIndifferentAccess. You will need to explicitly use it instead of a standard Hash.

Beware though, a quote from the class itself:

This class has dubious semantics and we only have it so that people can write params[:key] instead of params[‘key’] and they get the same value for both keys.

share|improve this answer
    
That quote is gone starting from rails 3. Also, the new site is api.rubyonrails.org –  Kelvin Feb 12 '13 at 20:00

So it really comes down to a fairly simple question of having to test for both symbols and strings. Is there an easy way to do both of these lines as one?

return true if settings["host"] and settings["db"]
return true if settings[:host] and settings[:db]

I'm not sure what you're really asking, because this doesn't seem totally related to the original title, but try:

# somewhere you get the values you are going to need to look up...
host = 'foo'
db = 'bar'
# then code goes by...
return true if settings[host.to_sym] and settings[db.to_sym]

# later you assign a symbol to one of the keys:
host = :foo
# more code goes by...
return true if settings[host.to_sym] and settings[db.to_sym]

It's all the same. Let Ruby covert from strings to symbols as necessary.

This works because:

'foo'.to_s   # => "foo"
:foo.to_s    # => "foo"
'foo'.to_sym # => :foo
:foo.to_sym  # => :foo

You pick whether you're going to use symbols or strings for hash keys and let Ruby sort it out.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.