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Yesterday an old project mixing Objective C and C++ compiled fine with xCode 4.2. Yes, the relevant files have a .mm suffix. Today I tried to make a new project, using much of the first project as a template, but it will not compile. I get errors like:

    Lexical or Preprocessor Issue
    'list' file not found

in response to:

    #include <list>

and this error:

    Semantic Issue
    Unknown type name 'class'

I went back to my old project that compiled fine yesterday for a sanity check, and boom, about the same thing:

    Semantic Issue
    Use of undeclared identifier 'std'

Did xCode suddenly forget how to find the entire standard type library?! Running gcc from the command line still works fine. One thing to note, all the errors come from .h files. This shouldn't matter. To date, xCode has always done the right thing with .h files when included from a .mm or a .cpp. Why would it suddenly stop? I swear I didn't change anything!

Thanks in advance...

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As another sanity check, I create a new iOS project, renamed the AppDelegate.m to AppDelegate.mm and added #include <string>, first to the .mm file and it compiled fine, then to the .h file and it says "'string' file not found". I'm guessing it has something to do with the way xCode precompiles some header files, but again, why this worked yesterday but does not today is mystifying. –  user1059198 Nov 22 '11 at 6:54
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1 Answer

I had this problem too... I had to go in and change the project settings to compile as Objective-C++, instead of "Compiler default for file type"... I think this will also be cured if you name the .cpp files .mm. But if you are like me, the code is shared, and you can't just change the file names...

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