Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get this compile error (sorry, unimplemented: mangling overload) for a piece of code that is, as far as I can tell, correct. I have tried to minimize the code to a manageable example, but it's still quite long (sorry about that). I know the C++11 stuff in there are under development, so it might be a problem with my compiler (GCC 4.6.2), but it might also be me missing something.

The mod-functions are merely placeholders for more complex functions (with different return types). The purpose of the real code is to provide indices over a collection of data structures, to allow fast look-up using different matching criteria.

Cheers
Markus

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <functional>
#include <cassert>

//
// Functions
//

struct mod2 : public std::unary_function<int, int> {
  int operator()(int x) const { return x % 2; }
};

struct mod3 : public std::unary_function<int, int> {
  int operator()(int x) const { return x % 3; }
};

struct mod4 : public std::unary_function<int, int> {
  int operator()(int x) const { return x % 4; }
};


//
// Base class foo
//

struct foo {
  std::vector<int> data_m;

  foo() : data_m() {}

  int& insert(int x) {
    data_m.push_back(x);
    return data_m.back();
  }

  template<typename trans_T>
  std::list<std::pair<typename trans_T::result_type, int> >
  match(const typename trans_T::result_type& pattern,
        const trans_T& trans = trans_T()) const {
    std::list<std::pair<typename trans_T::result_type, int> > results;
    for (auto it = data_m.begin(); it != data_m.end(); ++it) {
      auto p = trans(*it);
      if (pattern == p) {
        results.push_back(std::make_pair(p, *it));
      }
    }
    return results;
  }
};


//
// Derived class bar
//

template<typename base_T, typename trans_T>
struct bar : public base_T {
  typedef base_T base_type;
  typedef std::multimap<typename trans_T::result_type, int> index_type;
  index_type index_m;

  bar(const trans_T& trans = trans_T()) : base_type(), index_m() {}

  int& insert(int x, const trans_T& trans = trans_T()) {
    return index_m.insert(typename index_type::value_type(trans(x), base_type::insert(x)))->second;
  }

  std::pair<typename index_type::const_iterator,
            typename index_type::const_iterator>
  match(const typename trans_T::result_type& pattern,
        const trans_T& trans = trans_T()) const {
    return index_m.equal_range(pattern);
  }

  template<typename xtrans_T>
  decltype(base_type().match(typename xtrans_T::result_type(), xtrans_T()))
  match(const typename xtrans_T::result_type& pattern,
        const xtrans_T& xtrans = xtrans_T()) const {
    return base_type::match(pattern, xtrans);
  }

};


//
// Begin/end functions present in Boost but not in GCC
//

template<typename iter_T>
  iter_T begin(const std::pair<iter_T, iter_T>& range) {
  return range.first;
}

template<typename iter_T>
  iter_T end(const std::pair<iter_T, iter_T>& range) {
  return range.second;
}


//
// Main
//

int main(const int argc, const char** argv) {
  using std::cout;
  using std::endl;

  bar<bar<foo, mod2>, mod3> baz;


  ///
  /// Insert some numbers
  ///

  for (int i = 0; i < 20; ++i) {
    baz.insert(i);
  }

  for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i) {
    cout << "i = " << i << endl;

    ///
    /// Try to match with different functions
    ///

    auto baz_match_mod2 = baz.match(i, mod2());
    cout << "mod2:";
    for (auto it = begin(baz_match_mod2); it != end(baz_match_mod2); ++it) {
      assert(it->first == i);
      cout << ' ' << it->second;
    }
    cout << endl;

    auto baz_match_mod3 = baz.match(i, mod3());
    cout << "mod3:";
    for (auto it = begin(baz_match_mod3); it != end(baz_match_mod3); ++it) {
      assert(it->first == i);
      cout << ' ' << it->second;
    }
    cout << endl;

    auto baz_match_mod4 = baz.match(i, mod4());
    cout << "mod4:";
    for (auto it = begin(baz_match_mod4); it != end(baz_match_mod4); ++it) {
      assert(it->first == i);
      cout << ' ' << it->second;
    }
    cout << endl;
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
I suggest asking that question on gcc-help@gcc.gnu.org –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 22 '11 at 6:46
1  
So what's the question here? –  n.m. Nov 22 '11 at 6:50
    
@n.m.: Question is: is this a problem with gcc, or my understanding of c++ –  masaers Nov 22 '11 at 8:46
    
@BasileStarynkevitch: Thank's. –  masaers Nov 22 '11 at 8:47
4  
The word sorry indicates a known gcc problem. –  n.m. Nov 22 '11 at 11:26
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

GCC's error messages only use the phrase "sorry, unimplemented" when the problem is with the compiler, not with your code -- in this case, you are trying to make use of a C++11 feature that is not yet fully supported.

Unfortunately, GCC's website doesn't let me grep the code for that particular error message, so I can't help you figure out exactly what is not implemented. I second Basile's recommendation to ask on gcc-help@gcc.gnu.org.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I did take Basile's recommendation, and got the same answer from the gcc people. I guess I'm not confident enough to assume that the compiler is at fault. :-) –  masaers Nov 23 '11 at 5:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.