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I have a class,which implements Runnable interface. I want to create multiple threads for that class and I have found two approaches for creating a multithread:

  class MyRunnable implements Runnable {
        public void run() {
          System.out.println("Important job running in MyRunnable");
     }
   }

1.first approach:

    public class TestThreads {
    public static void main (String [] args) {
    MyRunnable r = new MyRunnable();
    Thread foo = new Thread(r);
    Thread bar = new Thread(r);
    Thread bat = new Thread(r);
    foo.start();
    bar.start();
    bat.start();
    }
    }

2.second approach:

public class TestThreads 
{
public static void main (String [] args) 
{
Thread[] worker=new Thread[3];
MyRunnable[] r = new MyRunnable[3];

for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
{
   r[i] = new MyRunnable();
   worker[i]=new Thread(r[i]);
   worker[i].start();

}
}
}

Which one is best approach to use and what is difference between both?

Regards

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2  
You do not need three instances of Runnable if that Runnable has no state (no instance variables). Beyond that, use an ExecutorService, do not make your own threads. –  Thilo Nov 22 '11 at 7:15
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your example the runnable has not instance state, so you don't need multiple instances of it.

Otherwise I like the second approach more, because every time you cut&paste a line of codemultiple times in a row, a loop usually is the better idea.

And usually, you should wait for a thread you started.

public class TestThreads {
    public static void main (String [] args) {
        Thread[] worker=new Thread[3];
        Runnable r = new MyRunnable();

        for(int i=0;i<3;i++) {
           worker[i]=new Thread(r);
           worker[i].start();
        }

         for(int i=0;i<3;i++) {
           worker[i].join();
           worker[i] = null;
        }
    }

}

The next step then would be using the ExecutorService of Java 5+. You don't want and need to manage you own thread in modern Java.

int poolSize = 3;
int jobCount = 3;
Runnable r = new MyRunnable()
ExecutorService  pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(poolSize);
for (int i = 0; i < jobCount; i++) {
    pool.execute(r);
}
pool.shutdown();
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I don't have much multithread programming experience. Until now, if I have to run multiple threads, I used the 2nd approach, but without using the ExecutorService. I don't understand very well the pros/cons of using it. Please, can you explain me? –  Alberto Solano Nov 22 '11 at 10:17
1  
@AlbertoSolano ExecutorService lets you reuse a pool of threads instead of creating new Thread for each runnable. –  tanyehzheng Nov 23 '11 at 11:20
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I would recommend you to use a ExecutorService. sample

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Only difference is the first one there is only one copy of "MyRunnable" that is run 3 times. 2nd approach each thread has its own copy of MyRunnable. Not a problem in this case as

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Well each one of the two approaches has their use:

  1. The first approach is useful if you have a few different tasks to execute in parallel that do not use the same Runnable interface (i.e. download a web page and in the mean time process some XML). Of course, this is not visible in your example, because you are using the same interface.
  2. The second approach is when you want to process the same thing with multiple threads (aka a master-slave pattern, where the master thread spawns a team of threads to process the same thing and then joins them at a barrier).
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