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I know this has been answered before and why this is caused. However, in my case, the problem is happening only on MacOS Lion (10.7) which is on php 5.3.6. The same code base is running on my windows 7 machine which is on php 5.3.8.

I have used require_once all over the place. The code fragment that seems to be causing the problem is:

class DbBase
{
   ...
}

in a file that is included from multiple files. However the error disappears if I wrap the class declaration inside of:

if (class_exists('DbBase') != true)
{
    class DbBase
    {
        ...
    }
} 

I have this scenario:

File DBBase.php:

defines Class DBBase

File A_DB.php:

require_once("DBBase.php")

File B_DB.php:

require_once("DBBase.php")

File foo.php:

require_once("A_DB.php")
require_once("B_DB.php)

So the file DBBase.php does get included twice. Does it?

Any insight is appreciated.

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It is highly unlikely that "Cannot redeclare class" error is caused by this code, as it does not seem to declare any classes. I would advise to post full error message and the file/line it refers to. –  StasM Nov 22 '11 at 7:54
    
You are correct, my apologies. The offending code is indeed a class definition. However, the error does not go away unless I wrap the class definition in a if (class_exists('ClassName') != true). –  Code Poet Nov 22 '11 at 8:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This error occurs when you declare a single class multiple times instead of once ; The code below would throw that error.

class phpp{}
class phpp{}

It is unlikely that the behaviour is not the same on 5.3.6 and 5.3.8 as there haven't been any significant changes in classes and objects.

You should check for duplicated codes in the files you are requiring once. . .

EDIT :

The require_once() statement is identical to require() except PHP will check if the file has already been included, and if so, not include (require) it again.

So in your case it is not being included multiple times, whereas it would if you use require or include.

However you should restructure your entire code to prevent class redeclaration's.

class lol{}
if(!class_exists("lol")){
    class lol{
        function ll (){
            return "ss";
        }
    }
}

echo lol::ll(); 

You wouldnt be able to access that ^^ , since its still a redeclaration.

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I've edited my question to include correct information. I apologize for the mistake. –  Code Poet Nov 22 '11 at 8:21
    
@ManishGupta Edited –  Mob Nov 22 '11 at 8:46
    
Thanks, I have added the necessary guards to prevent redeclaration. It still beats me though, why does this problem not show up on windows? –  Code Poet Nov 22 '11 at 8:53

I was having the same error. However, it wasn't related to 'declare a single class multiple times'. It was because I've made a backup of the class like this: class.shipping.php class.shipping_092512_bk.php Then, I uploaded the backup file to the server. That caused the application to fail due to the two classes. So, I renamed the backup to something else without .php file extension 'class.shipping_092512.bk'. Problem solved.

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