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The JDK documentation for java.lang.String.hashCode() famously says:

The hash code for a String object is computed as

s[0]*31^(n-1) + s[1]*31^(n-2) + ... + s[n-1]

using int arithmetic, where s[i] is the ith character of the string, n is the length of the string, and ^ indicates exponentiation.

The standard implementation of this expression is:

int hash = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
{
    hash = 31*hash + value[i];
}
return hash;

Looking at this makes me feel like I was sleeping through my algorithms course. How does that mathematical expression translate into the code above?

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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if you missed where it says "^ indicates exponentiation" (not xor) in that documentation.

Each time through the loop, the previous value of hash is multipled by 31 again before being added to the next element of value.

One could prove these things are equal by induction, but I think an example might be more clear:

Say we're dealing with a 4-char string. Let's unroll the loop:

hash = 0;
hash = 31 * hash + value[0];
hash = 31 * hash + value[1];
hash = 31 * hash + value[2];
hash = 31 * hash + value[3];

Now combine these into one statement by substituting each value of hash into the following statement:

hash = 31 * (31 * (31 * (31 * 0 + value[0]) + value[1]) + value[2])
     + value[3];

31 * 0 is 0, so simplify:

hash = 31 * (31 * (31 * value[0] + value[1]) + value[2])
     + value[3];

Now multiply the two inner terms by that second 31:

hash = 31 * (31 * 31 * value[0] + 31 * value[1] + value[2])
     + value[3];

Now multiply the three inner terms by that first 31:

hash = 31 * 31 * 31 * value[0] + 31 * 31 * value[1] + 31 * value[2]
     + value[3];

and convert to exponents (not really Java anymore):

hash = 31^3 * value[0] + 31^2 * value[1] + 31^1 * value[2] + value[3];
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RE your first sentence: Did you see some evidence that the question or a particular answer was assuming xor? –  David Citron May 5 '09 at 14:13
    
You'd expressed confusion about how the code and the documentation could be equivalent. Since the documentation was using "^" for exponentiation, but Java normally uses it to mean bitwise xor I wondered if that was the source of your confusion. (There were no other answers when I started writing my answer, BTW) –  Laurence Gonsalves May 5 '09 at 20:12
    
Ahh, I see. No, I was aware that it was exponentiation, but unclear on how the implementation followed from the mathematical expression. Your answer clarifies that greatly--but knowing to write that code given only that expression is still a leap for me. To arrive at that code, it would seem that you'd have to write out a small example, realize that you can "multiply by 0 in a clever way" in the innermost nesting to complete the pattern, then form the loop. –  David Citron May 5 '09 at 23:06
2  
It would not surprise me at all if the code actually came first, and the documentation was written afterwards. –  Laurence Gonsalves May 5 '09 at 23:32
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unroll the loop. Then you get:

int hash = 0;

hash = 31*hash + value[0];
hash = 31*hash + value[1];
hash = 31*hash + value[2];
hash = 31*hash + value[3];
...
return hash;

Now you can do some mathematical manipulation, plug in 0 for the initial hash value:

hash = 31*(31*(31*(31*0 + value[0]) + value[1]) + value[2]) + value[3])...

Simplify it some more:

hash = 31^3*value[0] + 31^2*value[1] + 31^1*value[2] + 31^0*value[3]...

And that is essentially the original algorithm given.

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You may want to explain it in terms of static single assignment (SSA) form, which then removes the need to think about what value "hash" has at any given point in time. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young May 4 '09 at 22:30
    
Looks like the original algorithm says it should be: 31^3*value[0] + 31^2*value[1] + 31^1*value[2] + ... Or is it just my fried brain misfiring? –  Adnan May 4 '09 at 23:14
    
Actually, you are correct, I will make the edit. –  CookieOfFortune May 4 '09 at 23:16
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Take a look at the first few iterations and you'll see the pattern start to emerge:

hash0 = 0 + s0 = s0
hash1 = 31(hash0) + s1 = 31(s0) + s1
hash2 = 31(hash1) + s2 = 31(31(s0) + s1) + s2 = 312(s0) + 31(s1) + s2
...
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<3 Thanks for (more or less) writing out CookieOfFortune's answer in SSA form. Much appreciated! –  Chris Jester-Young May 4 '09 at 22:34
    
How do you do subscripts? –  CookieOfFortune May 4 '09 at 22:47
    
Would be even better if you could vertically align all the corresponding terms, and distribute the 31(...) in the third line. –  Nikhil Chelliah May 4 '09 at 22:58
    
@CookieOfFortune: There's an HTML tag for it. Look at the page source. I'd have used Unicode, though. –  Nikhil Chelliah May 4 '09 at 23:00
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Proof by induction:

T1(s) = 0 if |s| == 0, else s[|s|-1] + 31*T(s[0..|s|-1])
T2(s) = s[0]*31^(n-1) + s[1]*31^(n-2) + ... + s[n-1]
P(n) = for all strings s s.t. |s| = n, T1(s) = T2(s)

Let s be an arbitrary string, and n=|s|
Base case: n = 0
    0 (additive identity, T2(s)) = 0 (T1(s))
    P(0)
Suppose n > 0
    T1(s) = s[n-1] + 31*T1(s[0:n-1])
    T2(s) = s[0]*31^(n-1) + s[1]*31^(n-2) + ... + s[n-1] = s[n-1] + 31*(s[0]*31^(n-2) + s[1]*31^(n-3) + ... + s[n-2]) = s[n-1] + 31*T2(s[0:n-1])
    By the induction hypothesis, (P(n-1)), T1(s[0:n-1]) = T2(s[0:n-1]) so
        s[n-1] + 31*T1(s[0..n-1]) = s[n-1] + T2(s[0:n-1])
    P(n)

I think I have it, and a proof was requested.

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oh snap! Induction! –  John Gardner May 4 '09 at 22:43
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Isn't it useless at all to count the hashcode of the String out of all characters? Imagine filenames or classnames with their full path put into HashSet. Or someone who uses HashSets of String documents instead of Lists because "HashSet always beats Lists".

I would do something like:

int off = offset;
char val[] = value;
int len = count;

int step = len <= 10 ? 1 : len / 10;

for (int i = 0; i < len; i+=step) {
   h = 31*h + val[off+i];
}
hash = h

At the end hashcode is nothing more than a hint.

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Ignoring half the characters in the string would mean that storing a sequence of "counting strings" into a hash table could easily cause 100 strings to map to each hash value. Ignoring more than half the characters would make things even worse. Ignoring any aspect of the string for hashing purposes risks a really huge penalty in exchange for a pretty small payoff. –  supercat Jul 22 '13 at 20:20
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