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I have a PHP site which have a login page. I have also an order.php page. When the user is not login then the order page redirect the user to the login page first. I want when the user redirect from the order page to the login page then on successfully login the user should redirect back to the order page. And When the user comes from other pages to the login page then on successfully login the user should redirect to the index.php page. How will I do this? Any Idea?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When the user is not login then the order page redirect the user to the login page first.

Why extra redirect?
Why not to show the login form right in place and upon successful login just redirect to the same page?

here is a brief example of the auth.php page

<?
if (isset($_POST['auth_name'])) {
  $name  = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['auth_name']);
  $pass  = MD5($_POST['auth_name'].$_POST['auth_pass']);
  $query = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE name='$name' AND pass='$pass'";
  $res   = mysql_query($query) or trigger_error(mysql_error().$query);
  if ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($res)) {
    session_start();
    $_SESSION['user_id'] = $row['id'];
  }
  header("Location: http://".$_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'].$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']);
  exit;
}
if (isset($_GET['action']) AND $_GET['action']=="logout") {
  session_start();
  session_destroy();
  header("Location: http://".$_SERVER['HTTP_HOST']."/");
  exit;
}
if (isset($_REQUEST[session_name()])) session_start();
if (empty($_SESSION['user_id'])) {
  return;
} else {
  include 'top.php';
?>
<form method="POST">
<input type="text" name="auth_name"><br>
<input type="password" name="auth_pass"><br>
<input type="submit"><br>
</form>
<? 
  include 'bottom.php';
}
exit;
?>

now you can just use one following line to protect any page

require "auth.php";
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I think this is a good approach. The order page has to check for itself, if the user is already logged in, anyway (for security reasons). Other pages can just link to the wanted page and don't have to check the login state themself, this gives a "natural" way to write the links. A link defines which target to load, and the target knows if it needs a login. –  martinstoeckli Nov 22 '11 at 13:28
    
though no need to make order page to check anything. Do all user verifications in the auth.php and just require it in the order page. That's all. I posted an example to play with. –  Your Common Sense Nov 22 '11 at 13:50
    
Your example looks good to me, one question thought: You included the login formular in this auth.php file, how would you allow to create a new account for new users, and login for existing users? –  martinstoeckli Nov 22 '11 at 14:10
    
existing users would just use this form and for the register one can add a link to register page. Or I didn't get your question –  Your Common Sense Nov 22 '11 at 14:14
    
If you link to the register page, then you would loose the login target (order page). I think it would be complicated to implement it so, that you can switch between register and login (but the order page only needs a logged in user, and doesn't care if it's a new one or an existing one). –  martinstoeckli Nov 22 '11 at 14:28

order.php

<?php 
if (!logged_in()){
   header("Location: login.php?referrer=order");
}
?>

login.php

<?php 
if (login_successful()){
   switch($_GET['referrer'])){
      case 'order':
          header("Location: order.php");
      break;
      case 'other':
          header("Location: other.php");
      break;
      default:
          header("Location: index.php");
   }
}
?>

form

<form method="post" action="login.php">
    //
    // Form content
    // 
</form>

---replace to---

form phpself

<form method="post" action="<?php echo $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']; ?>">
    //
    // Form content
    // 
</form>
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I do this when in my login page I have added the condition of if(isset($_POST['login'])). So when I click on the login button then it give me the error as then there is no parameter in the url only the login.php left. –  Ahmad Nov 22 '11 at 11:06
    
what should i do in this situation –  Ahmad Nov 22 '11 at 12:31
    
i updated answer.If you want,you can save referrer at session too –  Utku Yıldırım Nov 22 '11 at 12:59

Simply use a URL in your link. The url from order.php would be:
http://somesite.com/login.php?url=order.php
In your login page you can then read the $_GET["url"] and decide whether to redirect the user back, or redirect him to index.php.

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You can set a cookie, or session value, that tracks the return page. Upon successful login, check if there is a return page. If so, go to that page. If not, go to the default welcome page.

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1  
That might cause funny effects if you open the page in 2 windows which share the cookie. –  jantimon Nov 22 '11 at 8:13
    
How so? Using referrer, or a url-based solution, doesn't work if you only want to set some pages as the page to return to. For example, I go to the order page, and get bounced to a login page, but I forgot my password, so I go to the recover form, which takes me to a success page. Then I get an email with a link to reset my password, which then lets me reset it and take me to the login page. Now where do I go when I sign in without a cookie or session tracking that? –  minboost Nov 22 '11 at 8:16

Store the login target to the session, before redirecting to the login page.

Example:

  1. The order.php page checks if the user is already logged in and calls login.php if necessary. Before it does the redirect to the login.php page it stores the login target as itself $_SESSION['loginTarget'] = 'order.php';
  2. After the login page has finished successfully, it calls the login target. header('Location: '.$_SESSION['loginTarget'], true, 303); exit;

Because the login target is stored in the session, you can do error handling on the login page easily, or even create a new user account instead of login (no need to pass on the target in the url to every page).

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