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I have the following query:

SELECT * 
from stop_times 
WHERE (departure_time BETWEEN '02:41' AND '05:41' 
       OR departure_time BETWEEN '26:41' AND '29:41') 
    AND stop_times.stop_id IN(51511,51509,51508,51510,6,53851,51522,51533)

that returns 134 rows in ~800ms. If I split it:

SELECT * 
from stop_times 
WHERE (departure_time BETWEEN '02:41' AND '05:41' 
       OR departure_time BETWEEN '26:41' AND '29:41')

returns ~110k rows in ~10ms and

SELECT * 
from stop_times 
WHERE stop_times.stop_id IN(51511,51509,51508,51510,6,53851,51522,51533)

returns ~5k rows in ~100ms.

I tried using both a multi-column index (departure_time and stop_id) as well as 2 separate indexes, but in either case the first query can't seem to take less than ~800ms. My stop_times table has about 3.5M rows. Is there anything I could be missing and that would significantly speed up that first query?

UPDATE 1: SHOW TABLE CREATE:

CREATE TABLE `stop_times` (
  `trip_id` varchar(20) DEFAULT NULL,
  `departure_time` time DEFAULT NULL,
  `stop_id` varchar(20) DEFAULT NULL,
  KEY `index_stop_times_on_trip_id` (`trip_id`),
  KEY `index_stop_times_on_departure_time_and_stop_id` (`departure_time`,`stop_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

stop_id and trip_id being varchars instead of integers is beyond my control unfortunately...

UPDATE 2: EXPLAIN for departure_time, stop_id multi-column index:

select_type: SIMPLE
type: range
rows: 239084

EXPLAIN for stop_id, departure_time multi-column index:

select_type: SIMPLE
type: range
rows: 141

UPDATE 3: EXPLAIN for IN(51511,51509,51508,51510,6,53851,51522,51533)

select_type: SIMPLE
type: ALL
rows: 3556973 (lol)

EXPLAIN for IN("51511","51509","51508","51510","6","53851","51522","51533")

select_type: SIMPLE
type: range
rows: 141
share|improve this question
    
Can we see an output of SHOW TABLE CREATE tablename? Or at least the indexes. Index order can matter on WHERE clauses. Also, curious to make sure the datatypes are what I would expect them to be. Edit: You might also want to do an EXPLAIN statement and see what index options MySQL is seeing. I don't quite remember how MySQL handles date ranges and indexes. –  Corbin Nov 22 '11 at 8:17
3  
@melihcelik No, that is not correct. The order of the index is very important, but has nothing whatsoever to do with the order in the query. There isn't really room in this comment box to explain it properly though. –  Ariel Nov 22 '11 at 8:27
    
@Corbin see updated question. Did an EXPLAIN statement and MySQL is showing index_stop_times_on_departure_time_and_stop_id... –  samvermette Nov 22 '11 at 8:29
1  
Agreed with @Ariel, the two main things with multi-column indexes is to ensure you use the fields listed in the index from left to right without skipping any, and that the index column order allows the system to throw away the most data possible as early as possible. The order of the fields within the query is not important. –  Dave Rix Nov 22 '11 at 8:31
    
I will delete my previous comment as Ariel and Dave are right. I sometimes confuse where clause ordering on partitioned tables with multi-column indexes on regular queries, whatever. Multi-column indexes manual explains this perfect. –  melihcelik Nov 22 '11 at 9:04
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Did you create an index stop_id, departure_time? Because departure_time, stop_id will do absolutely nothing.

This is a really hard one - it has every possible bad thing for dealing with indexes :(

You have a range, an OR and a non contiguous IN - it doesn't get worse than that.

Try stop_id, departure_time and if it doesn't help then there is nothing much you can do short of switching to PostgreSQL.


You can also try rewriting the query as:

SELECT * 
from stop_times 
WHERE ( stop_times.stop_id IN(51511,51509,51508,51510,6,53851,51522,51533)
      AND departure_time BETWEEN '02:41' AND '05:41'
      )
   OR ( stop_times.stop_id IN(51511,51509,51508,51510,6,53851,51522,51533)
      AND departure_time BETWEEN '26:41' AND '29:41' 
      ) 

or:

    SELECT * 
    from stop_times 
    WHERE ( stop_times.stop_id IN(51511,51509,51508,51510,6,53851,51522,51533)
          AND departure_time BETWEEN '02:41' AND '05:41'
          )
UNION ALL
    SELECT * 
    from stop_times 
    WHERE ( stop_times.stop_id IN(51511,51509,51508,51510,6,53851,51522,51533)
          AND departure_time BETWEEN '26:41' AND '29:41' 
          )
share|improve this answer
    
Huh, making the index stop_id, departure_time makes the query even slower. It's now taking 3.54s. –  samvermette Nov 22 '11 at 8:36
    
@samvermette Are you sure you are not checking cached time? Because MySQL will cache queries by default and if you run the same one twice you won't get useful timing info. Change the query in any way (even a space) so it won't be found in the cache. –  Ariel Nov 22 '11 at 8:39
    
@samvermette also, please post the explain output for each type of index you make (i.e. I would like to see 3 different versions of the explain - one for each index possibility). –  Ariel Nov 22 '11 at 8:39
1  
@samvermette Man I actually thought of that, but in a quick test on my machine it made no difference. It could be that without a quote it is trying to convert the column to an integer first, and then compare it (rather than the reverse). (i.e. '001' and '1' both equal 1 - so it depends on if you do a string compare or an integer compare). But please!!! Check that you are not getting cached results for this very fast result. –  Ariel Nov 22 '11 at 8:48
1  
@samvermette Well now I'm going to want to see an explain for with and without quotes too :) –  Ariel Nov 22 '11 at 8:56
show 6 more comments

There is one possibility you could try, which is to prepare a list of all the times that occur within both ranges first, and then stick them together in a large IN clause - it may look horrible, but it will remove the OR condition which isn't helping your query... And you should be able to build the IN string using your favourite programming language :)

WHERE departure_time IN ('02:41','02:42','02:43', ... '26:41','26:42','26:43', ... etc )

Your query contains two blocks of three hours, which equates to 6 * 60 = 360 entries in the IN clause...

Worth a try at least...

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