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I have Double as value in hashmap with key as String. If I update the variable that was added as value to hashmap independently, instead of updating it in the hashmap, the updated value does not get reflected. That is when I use the key to get the value I get value as 0.0 instead of the updated value. I am not able to understand why this happens. Please throw some light on this. Also, is there some other way of updating the value in hashmap by updating the variable. A sample code of what I am talking about is below:

import java.util.HashMap;
public class TestDouble{
public Double d1 = 0.0;
public Double d2 = 0.0;
public Double d3 = 0.0;
private HashMap<String,Double> hm;

public TestDouble(){
    hm = new HashMap<String,Double>();
    hm.put("D1",d1);
    hm.put("D2",d2);
    hm.put("D3",d3);
}

public void updateD1(double d){
    d1 = d;
}

public void updateD2(double d){
    d2 = d;
}

public void updateD3(double d){
    d3 = d;
}

public Double getValue(String key){
    Double val = (Double)hm.get(key);
    return val;
}

public static void main(String args[]){
    TestDouble td =new TestDouble();
    td.updateD1(10.10);
    td.updateD2(20.20);
    td.updateD3(30.30);
    System.out.println("Value of D1 from HashMap = "+td.getValue("D1")+" from actual variable = "+td.d1);
    System.out.println("Value of D2 from HashMap = "+td.getValue("D2")+" from actual variable = "+td.d2);
    System.out.println("Value of D3 from HashMap = "+td.getValue("D3")+" from actual variable = "+td.d3);
}
}

The output I get is:

Value of D1 from HashMap = 0.0 from actual variable = 10.1
Value of D2 from HashMap = 0.0 from actual variable = 20.2
Value of D3 from HashMap = 0.0 from actual variable = 30.3
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Thanks to all. I guess I'll have to find another way of doing this. Thanks again –  shamshu Nov 22 '11 at 9:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Double is immutable. You can not update its value. Instead you can reference to another instance of a Double

d1 has a reference to a 0d:

Double d1 = 0d;

If we do another initialization it will be referencing another value:

d1 = 1d;

On the other hand HashMap is mutable, i.e. its internal state can be changed:

Map<String, Double> map = new HashMap<String, Double>();
map.put("first", 0d);
map.put("first", 1d);
System.out.println("first = " + map.get("first"));

The output will be:

first = 1.00

Bear in mind that we have replaced the value associated with the key first, it is not updated.

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In Java variables contain a reference to objects. Initially d1 and the HashMap entry for D1 point to the same object (so they each contain the same reference).

When you modify variable d1 to point to a new object, the value of the variable is changed to the reference to this new object. This change is only to d1, the HashMap entry for D1 still has the original reference as its value, and therefor is still pointing to the Double 0.00.

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Java passes references with values which means that your d1 is a reference to a Double instance with value 0.0. When you put this in your map you do not put d1 in the map, instead a copy of the d1 reference (also pointing to the Double instance with value 0.0). So no you have two references to your Double, one from d1, and one from the map. When you change d1 you do not change the value of the Double, but instead you change the reference d1 to point to another Double, and this does not change the reference stored in the map.

To get the effect you want you need to store an object to which you keep the reference and change the value of the object. Example:

import java.util.HashMap;

public class TestDouble {

    private static class Holder {
        Double value = 0.0;
    }

    private HashMap<String,Holder> hm = new HashMap<String,Holder>();;

    private Holder d1 = new Holder();

    public TestDouble(){
        hm = new HashMap<String,Holder>();
        hm.put("D1",d1);
    }

    public void updateD1(double d){
        d1.value = d;
    }

    public Double getValue(String key) {
        return hm.get(key).value;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]){
        TestDouble td =new TestDouble();
        System.out.println("Value of D1 from HashMap = "+td.getValue("D1")+" from actual variable = "+td.d1.value);
        td.updateD1(10.10);
        System.out.println("Value of D1 from HashMap = "+td.getValue("D1")+" from actual variable = "+td.d1.value);
    }
}
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Thanks for the input. I have done something similar to what you have suggested. Only I have used the primitive double in the static holder class. I think that should be fine. Please let me know if otherwise. Thanks again. –  shamshu Nov 23 '11 at 5:23
    
That should be fine, I just wanted to keep the example as close as possible to your original code. –  Roger Lindsjö Nov 23 '11 at 10:14
    
Thanks again @Roger –  shamshu Nov 23 '11 at 11:25

Double is an immutable data type just like String. So when you use a variable to help set a value for a mapping and then latter set it to some other Double value the two Double values are distinct. It is no wonder why you are getting observed behaviour.

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