Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to run an executable file using perl?

For instance, i want to run a plain notepad.exe. How could I achieve this?

This is what I've got:

my @args = system("notepad.exe");
system(@args) == 0  or die "system @args failed: $?";

But it returns:

Can't spawn "cmd.exe": No such file or directory blah blah blah.

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried Google? –  Bali C Nov 22 '11 at 9:54
    
Yes, but what I found doesn't makes sense to me. –  quinekxi Nov 22 '11 at 9:56
2  
system returns a single value, not an array. See perldoc -f system for a detailed description. This thread on perlmonks discusses the error you're getting (with a few different solutions being presented). –  gamen Nov 22 '11 at 10:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this.

my $prog = "C:\\strawberry\\perltest\\Extractor.bat";

if (-f $prog)   # does it exist?
{
    print "Will run notepad";
system($prog);
}
else  
{
    print "$prog doesn't exist.";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you. That's should explains. :) –  quinekxi Nov 22 '11 at 10:31

Your code seems a bit confused. What you probably want is something like

my $cmd = "notepad.exe";
my @args = ($cmd, "readme.txt");

system(@args);

if($? == -1) {
    die "system @args failed: $?";
}

system returns a single value, not an array. See perldoc -f system for a detailed description.

This thread on perlmonks discusses the error you're getting with a few different solutions being presented.

This answer is an extension of my original comment. Sorry if it's superfluous.

share|improve this answer
    
That thread really did answer my question. –  quinekxi Nov 22 '11 at 10:20

This is a Perl internal error probably caused by a broken environment. Perl can't find the Windows shell cmd.exe that is used under the hood to run the program passed to system.

Use some utility as Process Monitor to see what's going on at the OS level.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.