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I've created a program that can read DNA sequences that can generate the complementary strand, which further translates to an mRNA. However, I have to find the longest possible open reading frame for that DNA. I've coded something, but when it prints out the statement, I get no answer. Help?

This is what I have;

# Search for the longest open reading frame for this DNA.
print "\nHere is the largest ORF, from 5' to 3':\n" ;
local $_ = $RNA_seq ;
while ( / AUG /g ) {
    my $start = pos () - 2 ;
    if ( / UGA|UAA|UAG /g ) {
        my $stop = pos ;
        $gene = substr ( $_ , $start - 1 , $stop - $start + 1 ), $/ ;
        print "$gene" ;
    }
}

# The next set of commands translates the ORF found above for an amino acid seq.
print "\nThe largest reading Frame is:\t\t\t" . $protein { "gene" } . "\n" ;
sub translate {
    my ( $gene , $reading_frame ) = @_ ;
    my %protein = ();
    for ( $i = $reading_frame ; $i < length ( $gene ); $i += 3 ) {
        $codon = substr ( $gene , $i , 3 );
        $amino_acid = translate_codon( $codon );
        $protein { $amino_acid }++;
        $protein { "gene" } .= $amino_acid ;
    }
    return %protein ;
}

sub translate_codon {
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / GC[AGCU] /i )             { return A;} # Alanine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / UGC|UGU /i )              { return C;} # Cysteine
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / GAC|GAU /i )              { return D;} # Aspartic Acid;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / GAA|GAG /i )              { return Q;} # Glutamine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / UUC|UUU /i )              { return F;} # Phenylalanine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / GG[AGCU] /i )             { return G;} # Glycine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / CAC|CAU /i )              { return His;} # Histine (start codon);
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / AU[AUC] /i )              { return I;} # Isoleucine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / AAA|AAG /i )              { return K;} # Lysine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / UUA|UUG|CU[AGCU] /i )     { return Leu;} # Leucine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / AUG /i )                  { return M;} # Methionine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / AAC|AAU /i )              { return N;} # Asparagine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / CC[AGCU] /i )             { return P;} # Proline;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / CAA|CAG /i )              { return G;} # Glutamine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / AGA|AGG|CG[AGCU] /i )     { return R;} # Arginine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / AGC|AGU|UC[AGCU] /i )     { return S;} # Serine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / AC[AGCU] /i )             { return T;} # Threonine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / GU[AGCU] /i )             { return V;} # Valine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / UGG /i )                  { return W;} # Tryptophan;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / UAC|UAU /i )              { return Y;} # Tyrosine;
if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / UAA|UGA|UAG /i )          { return "***" ;} # Stop Codons;
}

Am I missing something?

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4 Answers

Put

use strict;
use warnings;

at the beginning of your code: it will help to detect problems

generally with

return A;

you are not returning a string but a file handle, if you want to return a string

return 'A';
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Have you checked out BioPerl at all? I haven't checked, but perhaps it already includes the functionality you require. Or are you currently working on an assignment for which you have to write the program yourself?

EDIT

I'm not quite sure about the first section of the code you have posted. For example, there are blanks within your regexes. Does the string you are trying to match actually include those blanks, or are the codons all written together, as in AUGCCGGAUGA? In the latter case there'd simply be no match, even though the codons you're looking for are present (I'm probably telling you things you know though... I just wanted to point it out, just in case :) ).

Also, what's the code of your pos function?

One more thing: you don't have to set $_, you can simply match $RNA_seq against a pattern, like so:

if ($RNA_seq =~ m/UGA/) { # ...

EDIT 2

I've thought a bit more about the first section, I think using the index function would be advisable here, as that immediately gives you the position within the sequence:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use List::Util qw( min );

my $string = 'UGAAUGGGCCAUAUUUGACUGAGUUUCAGAUGCCAUUGGCGAUUAG';
# the genes:     *-------------*           *---------------*

my $prev = -1;
my @genes;

while (1) {
   my $start = index($string, 'AUG', $prev+1);
   my $stop  = min grep $_ > -1, (index($string, 'UGA', $start+1), index($string, 'UAA', $start+1),
                                  index($string, 'UAG', $start+1));

   # exit the loop if index is -1, i.e. if there was no more match
   last if ($start < 0 or $stop < 0); 

   # using +1 so that 'AUGA' will not count as a gene
   if ($stop > $start+1) { 
      push @genes, substr($string, $start, $stop);
   }

   $prev = $stop; # I'm assuming that no second AUG will come between AUG and a stop codon
}

print "@genes\n";

This gives you

AUGGGCCAUAUUUGA AUGCCAUUGGCGAUUAG

I would say it might need some refinement, but I hope it'll be helpful all the same.

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If you want to put whitespace in your regular expressions for readability, you need to use the '\x' modifier as:

if ( $_ [ 0 ] =~ / GC[AGCU] /xi )

Then if you need to represent whitespace (which you shouldn't here) , simply use '\s' As an aside, rather than use '$_ [0]' consider:

sub translate_codon {
    my $codon = shift;
    return q(A) if $codon =~ m/ GC[AGCU] /xi;
    return q(F) if $codon =~ m/ UU[C|U]  /xi;
}
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There are several applications for ab-initio gene predictions. If you still want to code it from scratch I recommend looking into dynamic programming and the Smith–Waterman algorithm for local sequence alignment. Note, however, that for eukaryote organisms you should also account for RNA splicing.

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