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I am inserting data into a table by selecting from another table which may have duplicates. I thought my query was handling this by checking if the row already exists but I am getting a unique constraint violation.

Here is the query:

INSERT INTO FOLDER_USER (FOLDER_ID, USER_ID) 
    SELECT DECODE(FOLDERID,'F10', '1','F565','2','F11', '3','F81', '4','0'), USERID
    FROM DATA1.FOLDERS F1
    WHERE UPPER(OWNER) = 'ADMIN'
    AND NOT EXISTS 
        (SELECT 1 FROM FOLDER_USER F2  
         WHERE DECODE(FOLDERID,'F10', '1','F565','2','F11', '3','F81', '4','0')= F2.FOLDER_ID 
         AND F1.USERID = F2.USER_ID);
  • Table FOLDER_USER contains 2 columns FOLDER_ID (number), USER_ID (varchar) and combined they make up the primary key
  • Table FOLDERS contains 2 columns FOLDERID and USERID (both varchars). The value in FOLDERID needs to be decoded into a number depending on its value before being inserted into the new table
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Try adding a UNIQUE clause to your SELECT as in: SELECT UNIQUE DECODE(... –  Ollie Nov 22 '11 at 10:40
2  
Jens is right. The not exists clause is useless, unless you already had the decoded values in the table. Either use select unique as suggested by Ollie or use merge insert/update –  Raihan Nov 22 '11 at 10:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps the rows you are selecting are not unique within themselves.

Try:

INSERT INTO folder_user( folder_id,
                         user_id)
   SELECT UNIQUE 
          DECODE( folderid,  'F10', '1',  'F565', '2',  'F11', '3',  'F81', '4',  '0' ),
          userid
     FROM data1.folders f1
    WHERE UPPER( owner ) = 'ADMIN'
          AND NOT EXISTS
                 (SELECT 1
                    FROM folder_user f2
                   WHERE DECODE( folderid,  'F10', '1',  'F565', '2',  'F11', '3',  'F81', '4',  '0' ) = f2.folder_id
                         AND f1.userid = f2.user_id);
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The reason might be a misconception about how such a sql statment is executed.

It first select all the rows. And then inserts them all into the table. This means your exists clause does not see the rows inserted earlier by the same statements

From looking at the statement you might be under the impression that it inserts a row, then selects the next in a loop like fashion. This is not the case.

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