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I have a query like this :

$sql = "
        SELECT
            *
        FROM
            tbl_emp_data
        WHERE
            company_qualification = '$q'
    ";

Now my company_qualification field is not a single value ,instead its a words separated by commas like BSc,BA,BCom etc . And the value $q is a single value say BA . So how can I search the company data from the value $q . I can not use LIKE since its going to match fields like BA and BBA .

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use FIND_IN_SET

$sql = "
        SELECT
            *
        FROM
            tbl_emp_data
        WHERE        
           FIND_IN_SET($q,company_qualification)
    ";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Shakti ..... – Suraj Hazarika Nov 22 '11 at 10:47
    
It is showing Unknown column 'B.A' in 'where clause' ! – Suraj Hazarika Nov 22 '11 at 10:54
    
SELECT * FROM tbl_emp_data WHERE FIND_IN_SET(B.A,company_qualification) LIMIT 0, 10 – Suraj Hazarika Nov 22 '11 at 10:54
    
B.A is a string and must be surrounded by the single or double quote. put the '$q' in single quote and also make sure you are escaping user inputs before substituting them with query. – Shakti Singh Nov 22 '11 at 10:56
    
Oh..thanks again Shakti – Suraj Hazarika Nov 22 '11 at 10:59
$sql = "
        SELECT
            *
        FROM
            tbl_emp_data
        WHERE
            company_qualification IN ('".implode("','",$q)."')
    ";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks OptimusCrime... – Suraj Hazarika Nov 22 '11 at 10:47

You can use IN like this:

SELECT * FROM tbl_emp_data WHERE company_qualification IN ('BSc', 'BA', 'BCom');
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, Shakti Singh got there first. I don't know the difference between IN and FIND_IN_SET though. – Jake Lucas Nov 22 '11 at 10:45

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