Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is the code compiled in dev c++ windows:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int x = 5;
    printf("%d and ", sizeof(x++)); // note 1
    printf("%d\n", x); // note 2
    return 0;
}

I expect x to be 6 after executing note 1. However, the output is:

4 and 5

Can anyone explain why x does not increment after note 1?

share|improve this question
31  
I'd note that DevC++ uses a very old outdated compiler, you may want to upgrade to a newer IDE, e.g. Codeblocks Eclipse or Visual Studio –  Tom J Nowell Nov 22 '11 at 13:55
3  
++x produces the same result as x++, cygwin and gcc 3.4.4. –  yehnan Nov 23 '11 at 1:21
1  
Why is the output 4 and 5? Where is the 4 coming from? Shouldn't it be 5 and 5? –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 23 '11 at 12:07
5  
@Tim Pletzcker Because the first value is the sizeof the variable, and not the variable itself. –  Surfbutler Nov 23 '11 at 13:14
    
My answer was added due to a merge with this one my answer actually shows how you can get run-time evaluation in the case of VLAs which none of the others do. –  Shafik Yaghmour Feb 27 at 20:51
show 1 more comment

8 Answers

up vote 407 down vote accepted

From the C99 Standard (the emphasis is mine)

6.5.3.4/2

The sizeof operator yields the size (in bytes) of its operand, which may be an expression or the parenthesized name of a type. The size is determined from the type of the operand. The result is an integer. If the type of the operand is a variable length array type, the operand is evaluated; otherwise, the operand is not evaluated and the result is an integer constant.

share|improve this answer
37  
"If the type of the operand is a variable length array type, the operand is evaluated" wow! I never realized that –  Kos Nov 22 '11 at 11:13
3  
what do you mean by variable length array type? That does mean the operand is an array? The code in this case is not an array. Can you clear things up for me? –  Neigyl R. Noval Nov 22 '11 at 11:19
28  
A variable length array is an array declared with the size being a value unknown during compilation, for instance if you read N from stdin and make int array[N]. This is one of C99 features, unavailable in C++. –  Kos Nov 22 '11 at 11:23
12  
@LegendofCage, in particular this would mean that in something like sizeof(int[++x]) (really, really a bad idea, anyhow) the ++ could be evaluated. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 22 '11 at 12:01
3  
See example of VLA in use at http://ideone.com/Q89QP. –  pmg Nov 22 '11 at 13:29
show 11 more comments

sizeof is a compile-time operator, so at the time of compilation sizeof and its operand get replaced by the result value. The operand is not evaluated (except when it is a variable length array) at all; only the type of the result matters.

short func(short x) {  // this function never gets called !!
   printf("%d", x);    // this print never happens
   return x;
}

int main() {
   printf("%d", sizeof(func(3))); // all that matters to sizeof is the 
                                  // return type of the function.
   return 0;
}

Output:

2

as short occupies 2 bytes on my machine.

Changing the return type of the function to double:

double func(short x) {
// rest all same

will give 8 as output.

share|improve this answer
9  
Only sometimes - it's compile time if possible. –  Martin Beckett Nov 22 '11 at 17:09
1  
it's single clear explanation at this page that points out why –  gekannt Nov 22 '11 at 17:24
6  
-1, as this is in contradiction with the acccepted (and correct) answer, and does not cite the standard. –  Sam Hocevar Nov 23 '11 at 10:36
    
There's a nice benefit to compile-time resolution of the sizeof() operator when working with strings. If you have a string that is initialized as a quoted string, instead of using strlen(), where the character array comprising the string has to be scanned for the null-terminator at run time, sizeof(quoted_string) is known at compile time, and therefore at run-time. It's a small thing, but if you use the quoted string in a loop millions and millions of times, it makes a significant difference in performance. –  user2548100 Jan 16 at 1:17
add comment

sizeof(foo) tries really hard to discover the size of an expression at compile time:

6.5.3.4:

The sizeof operator yields the size (in bytes) of its operand, which may be an expression or the parenthesized name of a type. The size is determined from the type of the operand. The result is an integer. If the type of the operand is a variable length array type, the operand is evaluated; otherwise, the operand is not evaluated and the result is an integer constant.

In short: variable length arrays, run at runtime. (Note: Variable Length Arrays are a specific feature -- not arrays allocated with malloc(3).) Otherwise, only the type of the expression is computed, and that at compile time.

share|improve this answer
    
Even though this was slightly after the accepted answer in submission time, it was close enough, and the answer probably took long enough to answer, and is correct, so you get a vote from me. –  Paul Wagland Nov 29 '11 at 8:59
add comment

sizeof is a compile-time builtin operator and is not a function. This becomes very clear in the cases you can use it without the parenthesis:

(sizeof x)  //this also works
share|improve this answer
    
would sizeof((i++)) work? –  Gaotter Nov 22 '11 at 13:56
3  
@Gaotter: yes, the extra parenthesis are ignored: codepad.org/fhdjYhzV –  André Paramés Nov 22 '11 at 15:19
    
THIS is interesting. –  surfasb Nov 23 '11 at 6:25
1  
But how is this an answer to the question? –  phresnel Nov 23 '11 at 12:15
5  
@phresnel: This is just to make it clear that sizeof is "weird" and is not subject to the rules of normal functions. I edited the post anyway to remove the possible confusion with normal runtime operators like (+) and (-) –  hugomg Nov 23 '11 at 12:25
show 1 more comment

Note

This answer was merged from a duplicate, which explains the late date.

Original

Except for variable length arrays sizeof does not evaluate its arguments. We can see this from the draft C99 standard section 6.5.3.4 The sizeof operator paragraph 2 which says:

The sizeof operator yields the size (in bytes) of its operand, which may be an expression or the parenthesized name of a type. The size is determined from the type of the operand. The result is an integer. If the type of the operand is a variable length array type, the operand is evaluated; otherwise, the operand is not evaluated and the result is an integer constant.

A comment(now removed) asked whether something like this would evaluate at run-time:

sizeof( char[x++]  ) ;

and indeed it would, something like this would also work (See them both live):

sizeof( char[func()]  ) ;

since they are both variable length arrays. Although, I don't see much practical use in either one.

Note, variable length arrays are covered in the draft C99 standard section 6.7.5.2 Array declarators paragraph 4:

[...] If the size is an integer constant expression and the element type has a known constant size, the array type is not a variable length array type; otherwise, the array type is a variable length array type.

share|improve this answer
1  
The important thing to remember here is that most of the time, sizeof is effectively a macro - it doesn't create code, but precomputes the expected value and deposits it straight into the code. Note that this was the only behaviour until C99, as VBAs didn't exist (i'd never actually heard of them until this answer, believe it or not!) –  Corley Brigman Feb 24 at 18:17
    
In what way would sizeof (char[x++]); use the value of x for anything other than determining the value of the expression x++ and the new value for x, both of which are normal with that operator? –  supercat Feb 24 at 19:21
    
@supercat not sure what I was thinking there, fixed that. –  Shafik Yaghmour Feb 24 at 19:36
    
@alk... err, yeah, I meant 'VLA' of course :) Shafik - why would those evaluate at runtime? like i said, I've never seen VLAs, but the types of those are both known at compilation time, aren't they? –  Corley Brigman Feb 24 at 20:45
    
@CorleyBrigman the snappy answer would be b/c the standard says so, but the reason is b/c we don't know the array size at compile time so we have to evaluate the expression at run-time. VLAs are an interesting topic, here are two posts I have on them here and here. –  Shafik Yaghmour Feb 24 at 22:46
show 2 more comments

As the operand of sizeof operator is not evaluated, you can do this:

int f(); //no definition, which means we cannot call it

int main(void) {
        printf("%d", sizeof(f()) );  //no linker error
        return 0;
}

Online demo : http://ideone.com/S8e2Y

That is, you don't need define the function f if it is used in sizeof only. This technique is mostly used in C++ template metaprogramming, as even in C++, the operand of sizeof is not evaluated.

Why does this work? It works because the sizeof operator doesn't operate on value, instead it operates on type of the expression. So when you write sizeof(f()), it operates on the type of the expression f(), and which is nothing but the return type of the function f. The return type is always same, no matter what value the function would return if it actually executes.

In C++, you can even this:

struct A
{
  A(); //no definition, which means we cannot create instance!
  int f(); //no definition, which means we cannot call it
};

int main() {
        std::cout << sizeof(A().f())<< std::endl;
        return 0;
}

Yet it looks like, in sizeof, I'm first creating an instance of A, by writing A(), and then calling the function f on the instance, by writing A().f(), but no such thing happens.

Demo : http://ideone.com/egPMi

Here is another topic which explains some other interesting properties of sizeof:

share|improve this answer
add comment

The execution cannot happen during compilation. So ++i/i++ will not happen. Also sizeof(foo()) will not execute the function but return correct type.

share|improve this answer
2  
"The execution cannot happen during compilation." what do you mean? –  curiousguy Nov 23 '11 at 0:58
1  
Compilation will only create object code... The object code will be executed only when the user executes the binary. As sizeof happens at compile time assuming i++ will increment is wrong. –  rakesh Nov 23 '11 at 7:35
    
"As sizeof happens at compile time" you mean: "as sizeof is a compile time constant expression"? –  curiousguy Nov 23 '11 at 8:18
    
Like "#define" happens during pre-processing, similarly sizeof will happen at compile time. During compilation all the type information is available so sizeof is evaluated then and there during compilation and value is replaced. As already mentioned by @pmg "From the C99 Standard" before. –  rakesh Nov 23 '11 at 9:51
1  
"sizeof will happen at compile time" for something that is not a variable length array –  curiousguy Nov 23 '11 at 23:49
add comment

sizeof() operator gives size of the data-type only, it does not evaluate inner elements.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.