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I have override for controller that checks if certain session data exists. This data is required for repository to work properly so if it does not exist then after the check the user should be logged off.

protected override void Initialize(System.Web.Routing.RequestContext requestContext)
{
    base.Initialize(requestContext);
    if (Session["CompanyID"] != null)
    {
        repo.CompanyID = (long)Session["CompanyID"];
    }
    else
    {
        RedirectToAction("LogOff", "Account");
    }
}

My code looks like this, but even when the RedirectToAction is invoked the controller still opens the default action and the user is not logged off. Can You recommend on how to handle this problem?

I am using this session data in such a way because this is the first place i can get to it i know of and here i can check if this particular data exists. It is written when user logs in.

This data is a part of User in database. I have made a custom membership and roles provider. Is there a way to add this data to "User" of MembershipUser type somehow so it can be accessed in constructor like users username?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Consider using a custom ActionFilter instead.

public class HasCompanyIdAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        if (filterContext.HttpContext.Session["CompanyID"] == null)
        {
            filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(new RouteValueDictionary(new {action = "LogOff", controller = "Account"}));
        }
    }
}

It can then be applied as so:

[HasCompanyId]
public class MyController : Controller 
{
    public ActionResult SomeAction()
    {
        return View();
    }
}

This will apply the attribute for all requests that MyController (or it's subclasses) handles.

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I understand the principle, but it seems a bit unpractical. I cant make it a global filter since there are public areas of application, and then i have to apply it to every action that is inside the area that requires it? Is there any other way to break the loading of Controller after initialize and send it to another action of another Controller? –  Zak Nov 22 '11 at 11:48
    
You can apply the attribute to a controller, and it will be applied for every action within that controller, or a controller base class and then the action will be applied for every derived classes actions too! –  rich.okelly Nov 22 '11 at 11:54
    
Hmm, this way still does not address the fact i have to set it once. It seems that doing things via FilterAttribute this way would set it every time an action executes instead only when the Controller is instantiated? –  Zak Nov 22 '11 at 12:16
    
See update for how it can be applied. Yes, you'll need to perform the check each time one of the controller's action methods executes, since a controller's lifetime is generally not tied to a session. –  rich.okelly Nov 22 '11 at 13:26
    
I have figured out what you meant. I did know how to use a filter on controller. My issue was the assignment of the CompanyID each time the filter was applied but then i figured out i can keep the current way of assigning it, and use filter just for the SessionAlive check. thank you, this helped a lot. –  Zak Nov 22 '11 at 14:53

Just implement your solution by overriding OnActionExcuting in the base class instead. Then you can do everything you can do in the Action Filter. Like so:

public void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext){
  if (filterContext.HttpContext.Session["CompanyID"] != null)
     repo.CompanyID = (long)filterContext.HttpContext.Session["CompanyID"];
  else
     filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(new RouteValueDictionary(new {action = "LogOff", controller = "Account"}));
}

Some code omitted for brevity.

I tried both approaches and found implementing it via an action filter was more complex due to the Dependency Injection requirements I had. You can do it either way but felt the base class approach was a little clearer. I also wanted to set some properties on the base class to make a few standard objects available to the controller methods to save repetitive code DEVs were adding to the actions. The base class approach made this easy.

One caveat I'll add is I'm not suggesting this is a good approach to authentication/security, I'm looking at this purely from the perspective of wanting to perform some operations/validation prior to an action executing and also setting up some pre-populated data on the controller instance to follow the DRY principle.

Hope it helps.

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