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I am working through Graham Hutton's Programming in Haskell, and an exercise in Chapter 3 asks "What is the type?" for the function twice f x = f (f x).

I think I understand why the answer is twice :: (t -> t) -> t -> t. (Edit: I did not understand why. See my comment on Paolo's answer.) However, to experiment I wrote another function thrice f x = f (f (f x)).

What I definitely don't understand is why thrice also has a type of thrice :: (t -> t) -> t -> t.

They work the way I would expect (see below), but I can't see how the type of thrice makes sense.

From ghci:

>> twice tail [0,1,2,3,4]
[2,3,4]
>> thrice tail [0,1,2,3,4]
[3,4]
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1  
Just try to visualize "what goes in" and "what goes out". The nesting of the functions doesn't change any of that. –  musiKk Nov 22 '11 at 11:43
2  
(t -> t) -> t -> t can be understood as a function that take as parametter a (t -> t) function, a t element and return a t, which is the case for twice and thrice. In your example t is instancied as [Int]. tail goes from [a] -> [a], [0,1,2,3,4] is of type [Int], the result is also of type [Int]. –  yogsototh Nov 22 '11 at 11:51
    
In fact [0,1,2,3,4] is of type Num t => [t], meaning a list of numerical values. –  yogsototh Nov 22 '11 at 11:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sorry, maybe I don't understand your question, but if you look at your own example with list, you'll see that in both twice and thrice's case, the inputs are a function from list to list (tail) and a list ([0,1,2,3,4]) and the return type is a list.

So both twice and thrice match the signature (t -> t) -> t -> t: a function from t to t (in your case tail), a t (in your case a list) and another t (list) in return

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My question was probably unclear, because I was confused about exactly what the type of a function shows. I half thought that the signature should reflect the steps that the function itself went through. So I expected thrice to need another -> t in its signature. Thanks for clarifying (to me even) where I was confused. –  Telemachus Nov 22 '11 at 12:36
    
glad I've been of help :) –  Paolo Falabella Nov 22 '11 at 13:17

Perhaps it's easier to see point-free:

twice f = f . f
thrice f = f . f . f

so you compose f with itself a few times. To be able to compose f with itself, the result of applying f to an argument must have suitable type, so that f in turn can be applied to that. Now if you start with

f :: a -> r     -- argument type -> result type

the suitability condition means that r must match a. For type variables that means r = a. Thus, twice as well as thrice take a function from some type to the same type and return a function from that type to the same,

twice :: (a -> a) -> (a -> a)
thrice :: (a -> a) -> (a -> a)

Since the function-type arrow is right associative (x -> y -> z = x -> (y -> z), the last parentheses in the type can be omitted.

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I'm not yet familiar with point-free style, but thanks for the explanation in other terms. –  Telemachus Nov 22 '11 at 12:37

The type of twice states that twice is a function from a function with domain a and codomain a to a function with domain a and codomain a. The type of thrice states that thrice is a function from a function with domain a and codomain a to a function with domain a and codomain a.

To see why, consider a derivation of the type of twice and thrice. Given a function f : aa and variable x, the rule for determining the type of f (f x) states that we must first determine the types of of f and (f x), then apply the rule for function application. The rule for determining the type of (f x) states that we must first determine the type of f and x, then apply the rule for function application.

First, since f has type aa and x has type a, the rule for function application states that (f x) has type a. Since f has type aa and (f x) has type a, the rule for function application states that f (f x) has type a. An additional application of the rule for function application gives f (f (f x)) has type a. As you see, repeated application of the rule for application gives fn x will have type a for all n ∈ ℕ.

Second, the rule for function abstraction states that if x : τ, M : τ' and x does not occur free in M, then the abstraction λ x : τ . M has type ττ'. We have terms f (f x) and f (f (f x)) both with type a and a variable x with type a. Hence, the abstractions λ x : a . f (f x) and λ x : a . f (f (f x)) both have type aa. Finally, since f : aa, applying the rule for function abstraction once more gives λ f : aa . λ x : a . f (f x) and λ f : aa . λ x : a . f (f (f x)) have type (aa) → (aa).

As you can see, Haskell's type system is too inexpressive to state that twice applies a function f to an argument x two times whereas thrice applies a function f to an argument x three times. What it can express is that both twice and thrice accept a function as input and return a function from a term x to a term y both of type a. This function is λ x : a . f (f x) for twice and λ x : a . f (f (f x)) for thrice.

I would suggest reading a short introduction to the polymorphic λ-calculus, which Haskell's type system is based on. This will present the typing relation and, presumably, guide the reader in proving that certain terms have certain types.

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Based on your post, I'm very sure that I can't handle a short introduction to the polymorphic λ-calculus. Nevertheless, thanks for the answer. –  Telemachus Nov 22 '11 at 20:04
    
I don't think that's true. I think you'd find a well-done introduction surprisingly accessible. –  danportin Nov 23 '11 at 3:11

In an attempt to win the brevity contest:

Type signatures specify the types for the inputs (arguments) of a function, and for the value that the function returns.
So the number of items in a function's type signature is (n + 1), where n is the number of arguments that the function takes.

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Yes. I very much misunderstood Haskell's type signatures. I thought they were doing something much more sophisticated. Thanks. –  Telemachus Nov 23 '11 at 0:00

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