Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public class ParentClass
{
    public ParentClass(int param);
}

public class MyClass extends ParentClass
{
    private int _a;
    private int _b;
    private int _c;

    public MyClass(String input)
    {
        _a=CalculateA(input);
        _b=CalculateB(_a);
        _c=CalculateC(_a);
        super(_b+_c);
    }

    //a expensive procedure
    private int CalculateA(String text);

    private int CalculateB(int a);
    private int CalculateC(int a);  
}

Java doesn't allow chained constructors to be anything other than the first method put in a constructor. Chained constructors can't call nonstatic methods as paramenters (which removes the possibility of using Initialsers that return the value they initialize to).

How do I achieve the above code using legal Java?

share|improve this question
6  
What's the question? And constructors can definitely call nonstatic methods. –  JB Nizet Nov 22 '11 at 11:36
    
"Also constructors can't call nonstatic methods." That would be news to me. I'm fairly sure I used tons of methods from within a constructor. –  Till Helge Nov 22 '11 at 11:37
    
So what is the question? At the moment you have made a statment. –  Brett Walker Nov 22 '11 at 11:37
    
Fixed my question, thanks –  Oxinabox Nov 22 '11 at 11:48
    
Is param private to the parent class? Does it have to be? If not, you could call super(-1); (or another dummy value), do the calculations in the subclass constructor, and then assign param = _b+_c;. –  arne.b Nov 22 '11 at 11:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Edit Indeed Java does not allow a constructor to do any calculations before the call to a parent's class constructor, even if these involve only static methods (as your calculateX's should be) and results only assigned to variables that are private to the class (like your _a, _b and _c) or local to the constructor.

There is a way around this, however: call another constructor with the result of the calculateX call assigned to its parameter - then you can access this result throughout the other constructor.

public class MyClass extends ParentClass {
    private int _a,_b,_c;

    public MyClass(String input) {
        this(calculateA(input));
    }

    private MyClass(int a) {
        this(a, calculateB(a), calculateC(a));
    }

    private MyClass(int a, int b, int c) {
        super(b + c);
        this._a = a;
        this._b = b;
        this._c = c;
    }

    private static int calculateA(String text) {
        try {Thread.sleep(1000);} catch (Exception e) {}  // expensive ;-)
        return text.length();
    }

    private static int calculateB(int a) { /* ... */ }
    private static int calculateC(int a) { /* ... */ }
}

Edit 2 With more calculations or more intermediate results to store for later use, this approach would lead to an even longer chain of constructors consisting only of this(...)-calls. A more fancy solution with only two constructors, the public one and one private, is possible with a helper class (reasonably an inner class):

    public MyClass(String input) {
        this(new InitCalcResult(input));
    }

    private MyClass(InitCalcResult initCalcResult) {
        super(initCalcResult.initB + initCalcResult.initC);
        this._a = initCalcResult.initA;
        this._b = initCalcResult.initB;
        this._c = initCalcResult.initC;
    }

    private static class InitCalcResult {
        private int initA, initB, initC;

        InitCalcResult(String input) {
            initA = calculateA(input);
            initB = calculateB(initA);
            initC = calculateC(initA);  
        }
    }

(using the same private fields and static calculateX methods as above).

share|improve this answer
    
This was my original play. Problem is i still need _a. –  Oxinabox Nov 22 '11 at 11:46
    
@Oxinabox The value of _a is calculated in the line of my super call and then passed to calulateB and calculateC via calculateBPlusC. Do you mean you still need _a for later use? –  arne.b Nov 22 '11 at 11:51
    
indeed, I need _a, _b and _c for later use, –  Oxinabox Nov 22 '11 at 12:09
    
I had considered a static Factory method. Problem was all the other classes in this partiular library are instantiated with there constructors. My supervisor is keep to keep it that way (and for good reason) –  Oxinabox Nov 22 '11 at 13:59
    
I think there is indeed a way to get what you want. I've replaced my previous answer since I think the new way is so much better (but thanks for accepting the answer even when it did not quite answer your question ;-) )- –  arne.b Nov 26 '11 at 18:18

You can do something like this.

public abstract class ParentClass
{
    public ParentClass(String input){
        int a = getData(input);
        /* Do what ever u need to do with a*/
    };

    public abstract int getData(String input);
}


public class MyClass extends ParentClass
{
    private int _a;
    private int _b;
    private int _c;

    public MyClass(String input)
    {
        super(input);
    }

    public int getData(String input){
         _a=CalculateA(input);
         _b=CalculateB(_a);
         _c=CalculateC(_a);
         return _b+_c;
    }

    //a expensive procedure
    private int CalculateA(String text){/* return int */};

    private int CalculateB(int a){/* return int */};
    private int CalculateC(int a){/* return int */};  
}

Since getData is abstract, the base class function will get called. And the super class will get the required data.

share|improve this answer
    
This could work, Not abstract because Parent isn't an abstract class. But virtual (wait, virtual is the default in java, right?). Messy though, Parent is the base class for 2 other classes, as well as being a functioning class in its own right. Also Parent's constructors infact chain onwards to "GrandParent"'s constructors. It becomes even messier because while I put in my example just 1 param for the Paret Constructor, it is actually 5. –  Oxinabox Nov 22 '11 at 13:52
    
Don't do this. If someone implements the abstract method using a field that's initialized in the subclass' constructor, the field will still be null when the method is called. This can lead to some obscure bugs. –  Jorn Nov 26 '11 at 19:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.