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In a for-loop in C#, which of the following codeblocks are the best performance wise? Or is there no difference? The diffenrence is whether the condition is saved in a local variable or read directly from an object.

Option 1

float maxDepth = 0;
int maxnumber = 0;

for (int i = 0; i < defects.Total; i++)
{
    if (defects[i].Depth > maxDepth)
    {
        maxDepth = defects[i].Depth;
        maxnumber = i;
    }
}

Option 2

float maxDepth = 0;
int maxnumber = 0

int defectNumber = defects.Total;
for (int i = 0; i < defectNumber; i++)
{
    if (defects[i].Depth > maxDepth)
    {
        maxDepth = defects[i].Depth;
        maxnumber = i;
    }
}

I'm sorry if this question have been asked a lot, but I couldn't find it anywhere.

Anders

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Why not just try it and see? –  asawyer Nov 22 '11 at 13:06
    
The compiler will know that Total doesn't change during the loop and will replace it with the value, so you will end up with the second code anyway. –  MBen Nov 22 '11 at 13:13
    
@MBen: How could the compiler know that? We don't know that. We don't know what defects.Total does. –  Jon Skeet Nov 22 '11 at 13:14
    
@JonSkeet Doesn't the compiler see that Total is not changed in our loop and replace it with the constant? –  MBen Nov 22 '11 at 13:18
1  
@MBen: Where's the declaration for Total? Perhaps it's implemented as public int Total { get { DateTime.Now.Seconds; } } –  Jon Skeet Nov 22 '11 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For all such questions you can use System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch like this.

var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
stopwatch.Start();

float maxDepth = 0; 
int maxnumber = 0;  
for (int i = 0; i < defects.Total; i++) 
{    
    if (defects[i].Depth > maxDepth)     
    {         
        maxDepth = defects[i].Depth;         
        maxnumber = i;     
    } 
} 

stopwatch.Stop();
Debug.WriteLine("Elapesed time for method 1: {0} msec.", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
stopwatch.Reset();
stopwatch.Start();

maxDepth = 0; 
maxnumber = 0;  
int defectNumber = defects.Total; 
for (int i = 0; i < defectNumber; i++)     
{    
    if (defects[i].Depth > maxDepth)     
    {         
        maxDepth = defects[i].Depth;         
        maxnumber = i;     
    } 
} 
stopwatch.Stop();
Debug.WriteLine("Elapesed time for method 2: {0} msec.", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

Then you got exact information. (The best way is to take several runs and use the mean value)

share|improve this answer
    
Guess I'll try this. Just thought there was a generel answer to this:) –  Anders Jørgensen Nov 22 '11 at 13:46
    
@AndersJørgensen: Of course there are general answers to everything. ;-) But that's theory, I always make the cross check to reality and do some measuring. –  Fischermaen Nov 22 '11 at 13:48

Your first example has to keep resolving defects.Total on every pass through the loop. In general, that would be slower than having a value in a native int. I don't have knowledge of the internal workings of C#, so I can't say for sure which is faster or by how much, but overall I'd say the second way is better.

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Option 2 will use a tiny amount more memory, but it will be a tiny bit faster due to one less dereferencing step.

There won't be much difference either way, unless you're computing over billions+ of iterations.

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I do not think that matters a lot when it comes to performance, however I use the second option for better observation of the code, easier debugging and readibility like below:

float maxDepth = 0; 
int maxNumber = 0 

int defectNumber = defects.Total; 
for (int i = 0; i < defectNumber; i++) 
{ 
    float defectsCurrentDepth = defects[i].Depth;
    if (defectsCurrentDepth > maxDepth) 
    { 
        maxDepth = defectsCurrentDepth; 
        maxNumber = i; 
    } 
} 
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