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Is there a way to work around this?Im declaring class objects in a switch statement and later using that variable outside the switch, it only works if i put the rest of my code in each case which isnt very efficient.Heres my code

switch (shape)
{
case 'q':
{
    Quad geo(a,b,c,d);
}
break;
case 'r':
{
    Rectangle geo(a,b,c,d);
}
break;
case 't':
{
    Trapezoid geo(a,b,c,d);
}
break;
case 'p':
{
    Parrelogram geo(a,b,c,d);
}
break;
case 's':
{
    Square geo(a,b,c,d);

}
break;
default:
    break;
}

 geo.print();//obviously wont work
share|improve this question
1  
Do the types 'Quad', 'Rectangle', etc inherit from the same base class? –  hmjd Nov 22 '11 at 13:26
    
yes Quad is the base –  user954004 Nov 22 '11 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have an IPrintable interface, like this

struct IPrintable
{
    virtual ~IPrintable() {}
    virtual void Print() = 0;
};

Then, derive your types Quad, Rectangle, etc from IPrintable, i.e. implement that interface. Then your code looks like this:

std::unique_ptr<IPrintable> pShape;
switch(shape)
{
    case quad:
       pShape.reset(new Quad(...));
    case rect
       pShape.reset(new Rect(...));
}
if(pShape)
    pShape->Print();

Of course, if the common functionality is more than print, you can add those functions to the interface as well. Also take a look at the visitor pattern. It may or may not be of help to you depending on the specifics of your problem.

share|improve this answer
1  
unique_ptr would be a better choice in this case (why do people always use shared_ptr??), as the object is not shared, but the rest of the code would be exactly the same +1 –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 22 '11 at 13:48
    
@David: I agree with you. Edited. –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 22 '11 at 13:55
    
Need to ensure that the stored pointer in pShape is not-null prior to pShape->Print() call. –  hmjd Nov 22 '11 at 13:55
    
@hmjd: Done that too –  Armen Tsirunyan Nov 22 '11 at 13:57

No, it is not possible. geo can only have one type at compile time, and it cannot change at runtime.

You could do something similar with dynamic allocation and polymorphism, but it might not be the best solution to your problem.

With the knowledge that Quad is the base class of the others, the following might be a usable solution:

Quad* geo = 0;
switch (shape) {
case 'q':
    geo = new Quad(a,b,c,d);
    break;
case 'r':
    geo = new Rectangle(a,b,c,d);
...
default:
    break;
}
if (geo) geo->print();
delete geo; // Ok if geo is 0.

This solution is not particularly pretty, mainly because it uses raw pointers and new and delete directly. A more polished version would use the Factorypattern, returning a smart pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
let me try this out –  user954004 Nov 22 '11 at 13:41
    
the problem with this is that i have a overidden print function so its only called the quad print function if i enter a different shape –  user954004 Nov 22 '11 at 13:43
    
@user954004: Am I understanding that print is not a virtual function? It should be. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 22 '11 at 13:49
    
would just declaring the base class or all derived class' virtual work? –  user954004 Nov 22 '11 at 13:53
    
You should prefer using smart pointers to manage the memory. If print throws, you will leak the object. +1 anyway. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 22 '11 at 13:53

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