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I have a 1x1000 vector, consisting of 1's and 0's. I would like to find four consecutive 0's in the vector and replace it by combination of 0's and 1's (for eg, 1101,1111,1010 any combination of the binary values from 1 to 15) but i should not replace or affect already existing 1's in the vector.

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Do you want to replace all occurrences of four consecutive zeros? Do you want to replace all of them by the same binary number? –  Jonas Nov 22 '11 at 15:10
    
related question: MATLAB: finding islands of zeros in a sequence (also look at its linked questions) –  Amro Nov 22 '11 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

Quick concept, scrolling window looking at each 4 element block and checks against an array of zeros.

%calling your vector "A" here
searchlen= 4 - 1; %remove 1 so when adding to index, takes correct # elements
zarray= zeros(1,searchlen+1);
for i=1:(length(A)-searchlen)
  if(isequal(A(i:i+searchlen),zarray))
    A(i:i+searchlen) = [1 0 0 1]; %replace with your code
  end
end
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Thank you very much for replying but when i compile this code i get an error "undefined function or method len for input argument of type double" one morething what will this code return? will it return me a modified vector? –  Kishore pandey Nov 22 '11 at 15:46
    
should read length instead of len, I'll edit it into my code above. This code edits in place. –  AlwaysWrong Nov 22 '11 at 15:49
    
Thank you very much will try and get back to you!! and by the way what does the line searchlen=4 - 1 do? do i have to remove 1 in my code? or should i leave it as it is? –  Kishore pandey Nov 22 '11 at 15:58
    
It comes from the way the number you compare are picked out. T=[1 2 3 4 5 6 7];T(2:2+4) gives [2 3 4 5 6], which you see it five elements long, you only want four –  Vidar Nov 22 '11 at 16:27
    
Vidar is correct in why I included the "-1" in the line. Besides that, if your array was actually called "A" then good news! You can copy and paste the above and it should work. You could also mix in some of the code above from Amro's solution if you had wanted random numbers replacing the 0's, or just go with his altogether. –  AlwaysWrong Nov 22 '11 at 21:40

you could use STRFIND to find the locations of all four-consecutive zeros

%# binary row-vector
x = [1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0];

%# starting locations of four-consecutive zeros
idx = strfind(x, [0 0 0 0]);

%# random binary numbers (rows) used to replace the consecutive zeros
n = dec2bin(randi([1 15],[numel(idx) 1]),4) - '0';

%# linear indices corresponding to the consecutive-zeros
idx = bsxfun(@plus, idx', (0:3));

%'# replace the 4-zeros
xx = x;
xx(idx(:)) = n(:);

The result:

>> x
x =
     1     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0
           \_______1st_______/

>> xx
xx =
     1     1     0     1     0     1     1     1     1     0     1     1     0     1     1
           \_______1st_______/

>> n
n =
     1     0     1     0      <-- 1st consecutive four-zeros replaced by this
     1     1     1     0      <-- 2nd
     1     0     1     1          etc...

Note that if the initial vector x contains consecutive-zeros of length longer than 4, strfind will return multiple locations within that longer sequence. So further processing would be required depending to how you want to select 4 from the longer sequence (first occurring, last occurring, etc..)

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Thank you very much Amro.. it's working great!! –  Kishore pandey Nov 22 '11 at 16:32
    
Your final note is a non-issue if it is filling with random binary numbers. The second subset might replace 3 of the numbers just generated in the first subset, but the one that remained is still random. –  AlwaysWrong Nov 22 '11 at 21:42
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@Kishorepandey - if this answer helped you, hit the check mark next to it to officially accept it. –  Dang Khoa Nov 23 '11 at 20:29

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