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Problem: Test if x ∉ { 2, 3, 61, 71 }

I often wondered if there is not a better way than:

if (x != 2 && x != 3 && x != 61 && x != 71)
{
  // do things
}

and

if (!new List<int>{ 2, 3, 61, 71 }.Contains(x))
{
  // do things
}

The latter one seems quite elegant, but actually it is kind of irritating if you read it, especially because of the inversion. It's kind of an ugly thing because in English we say "x is not element of ...", which is hard to express in C# without irritating overhead. Maybe one coud say if (Object(x).IsElementOf(new[] { ... })) or so?

Hmm.. any suggestions? Are there any .Net standard methods to test things like that?

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2  
This is a duplicate but I'm having a bit of trouble finding the other question myself... –  BoltClock Nov 22 '11 at 15:04
    
I can't vote to close, ran out, but stackoverflow.com/questions/163732/… –  user7116 Nov 22 '11 at 15:06
5  
@Efrain, did you mean && instead of ||? The two code snippets don't do the same thing... –  Thomas Levesque Nov 22 '11 at 15:07
    
I'm not a C# developer, but I am certainly more attracted to the simple approach you're trying to avoid than any of the others listed. I really don't understand why any of the others could be 'better'. They require more code, more instructions, and a loop when one is not necessary. –  user606723 Nov 22 '11 at 17:59
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6 Answers

up vote 34 down vote accepted

I use an extension method:

using System.Linq;

...

public static bool In<T>(this T item, params T[] list)
{
    return list.Contains(item);
}

...


if (!x.In(2,3,61,71))
...

You can rename it to IsElementOf if you prefer this name...

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Note for people who may wonder, the Contains method on the array is supplied by the LINQ namespaces. –  Adam Houldsworth Nov 22 '11 at 15:09
1  
@AdamHouldsworth, good point, thanks. I added the necessary using clause to make it clear –  Thomas Levesque Nov 22 '11 at 15:15
    
No problem, +1 either way for a very cute snippet. I'm not ashamed to admit I'm likely to plagiarise that in future :-) –  Adam Houldsworth Nov 22 '11 at 15:16
1  
<micro-optimisation>If this method is intended to be used a lot and/or against a large number of elements then you might get a slight perf improvement by using Array.IndexOf(list, item) != -1 internally rather than LINQ's Contains method.</micro-optimisation> –  LukeH Nov 22 '11 at 15:17
    
@LukeH, you're right, it would be more efficient. However I wouldn't expect this method to be used against a large number of elements, so it would probably not make a noticeable difference... –  Thomas Levesque Nov 22 '11 at 15:19
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You could use following LinQ method:

var list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
var number = 3;

if (list.Any(item => item == number))
    //number is in the list

And for the readability you can put it in an extension method:

public static bool IsElementOf(this int n, IEnumerable<int> list)
{
    return list.Any(i => n == i);
}

//usage
if(3.IsElementOf(list)) //in the list
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what about

if(new[] { 2, 3, 61, 71 }.Except(x).FirstOrDefault() != 0)
{
   ...
}

or something on those lines?

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var list=CreateNewList(); //returns your list of elements
var element=GetElement(); //returns an element that might be in the list
if(list.Any(x=>x.Equals(element))
{
  //do something
}

It's still inverted from what you're used to but it's more expressive (if the list has any value that equals element).

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Assuming you meant && and not ||, you can just write a func and use that throughout your code. You can shorten the new[] part since the type (int) is infered by the in paramter of the func.

Func<int, bool> IsSafe = x => !new[] { 2, 3, 61, 71 }.Contains(x);

Console.WriteLine(IsSafe(68)); // is true
Console.WriteLine(IsSafe(2));  // is false
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TL/DR: Stick with that, but use HashSet<T> instead of List<T>.

To elaborate: as user606723 already mentions, the solutions proposed add overhead and extra methods (plus I'm seriously opposed to extension methods unless you really really cannot add the method to the type they wrap and they are extremely useful) to just a "readability" problem which is not a big deal. Every programmer would understand what you wrote with the ".Contains()" call, it is just not as close as the English language, but get over it! (And just a little nitpick: use HashSet<T> instead of List<T> if you're really talking about a set of elements, and not a list; that is, elements cannot be repeated in the collection.)

On the other hand, if you really want to help on readability, ok, add an extra method, but don't call it "In" or things like that. Call it with a name inside the problem domain language you're trying to solve. For example, if the number is a userID and the set of numbers is a cache, call it IsAlreadyCached(). This way you're killing 2 birds with 1 stone because you're refactoring via method extraction: you make your method smaller by dividing it in smaller parts, while improving readability for the next programmer to come.

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Er, don't forget to store the collection somewhere. Constructing a new HashSet will actually take more overhead than just doing each comparison in turn (or even than constructing a List). Ultimately, just doing the comparisons is probably still faster for a small set [like this only four elements] that never changes –  Random832 Nov 22 '11 at 20:25
    
-1 for recommending sticking with a (significantly) worse alternative than the accepted answer. –  John Buchanan Nov 23 '11 at 0:39
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