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In the code below, I have tried to display alert when the user clicks on the document.As I have done doAlert() with parenthesis, the code runs when the document load and alerts without any events occur but if I do simply

doAlert

It seems to respond when I click the document. So, is it must that I should call function in javascript without the parenthesis or what is the idea for doing this. What if I were to pass parameter to a function.

<!doctype html>
    <html>
    <head>
    <script>
    function doAlert(){
        alert("Hello");
    }
    function init(){
        document.onclick = doAlert();
    }
    window.onload = init();
    </script>
    </head>
    <body>

</body>
</html>
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you call a function, you get its return value.

window.onload = init();

This runs init() and sets window.onload to its return value, undefined.

You need to set it like this:

window.onload = init;

Now window.onload is set to the function init, it won't run until it needs to.

If you want to pass parameters, like in your onClick, you can do it like this:

document.onclick = function(){
    doAlert('Clicked');
};

This sets onClick to an anonymous function, that calls the functions you want. Or, you can use a closure:

function doAlert(param){
  return function(){
    alert(param);
  };
};

document.onClick = doAlert('Hello World');

doAlert is called, onClick is set to its return value, which is a function (in this case one that alerts 'Hello World').

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1  
Good explanation ... Much clear now. I was infact calling the function while I was setting function to event. Very helpful. Thanks –  insane-36 Nov 22 '11 at 15:59
    
@insane-36: No problem. Functions in JavaScript can be treated as variables, it's weird. It's because function a(){} is the same as doing var a = function(){}. –  Rocket Hazmat Nov 22 '11 at 16:01

If foo is a function, then bar = foo will assign that function to the variable bar, but bar = foo() will immediately call the function and assign its return value to bar instead.

Event handlers work by being given a function that will be called when the event happens. If you run the function immediately then its return value needs to be a function that you want to run when the event happens (in this case the return value of both doAlert and init is undefined).

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Quentin has it right, your code is executing the call the function, not assigning it as the handler. –  Dave G Nov 22 '11 at 15:39
    
Easier to understand, but tangled me ... Thank you –  insane-36 Nov 22 '11 at 15:57

document.onclick is being set to the return of doAlert and not the doAlert function itself.

Your code should look like:

<!doctype html>
    <html>
    <head>
    <script>
    function doAlert(){
        alert("Hello");
    }
    function init(){
        document.onclick = doAlert;
    }
    window.onload = init;
    </script>
    </head>
    <body>

</body>
</html>
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Functions in Javascript are objects and can be passed along like any other variable. In your case, doAlert is just a reference to a function. In order to call the function pointed by this reference, you need to use parenthesis : doAlert().

The document.onclick method is supposed to be a function reference, so you assign it a function reference like this : document.onclick = doAlert. With your syntax, you assign the result of a call to doAlert() to document.onclick, which is incorrect.

Got it ? :)

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Thanks, got it now ... –  insane-36 Nov 22 '11 at 15:44

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