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I would like to know if there is a better way of writing the SELECT clause in the query below. There are three possible cases for status. It can either have a value of 'A' or 'N' or null.

I think that placing the AND status = 'A' in the where clause is redundant when you are comparing the subTable values to a value of 'A'. Is there any way that this could be rewritten more efficiently? I feel like restricting the status in the WHERE clause is always going to give you an 'A' and hence pointless to do the CASE statement.

ALTER VIEW dbo.st_review_status_vw AS
(
    SELECT c.st_id, c.ms_price_comp_fy, 
        CASE
            WHEN (SELECT status FROM 
                    (SELECT st_id, status, ms_price_comp_fy
                     FROM ms_price_comp
                     WHERE st_id = c.st_id 
                         AND ms_price_comp_fy = c.ms_price_comp_fy 
                         AND status = 'A'
                     GROUP BY st_id, status, ms_price_comp_fy)
                 AS subTable) = 'A' THEN 'C'
            ELSE 'I'
        END AS status,
        MAX(date_approved) AS date_completed
    FROM ms_price_comp AS c
    GROUP BY c.st_id, c.ms_price_comp_fy
)
share|improve this question
    
"the WHERE clause is always going to give you an 'A'" - not necessarily; the innermost sub-select might return no records, so the selected status in the outer sub-select would be NULL; the CASE item would then evaluate as 'I'. –  Mark Bannister Nov 22 '11 at 15:53
    
Are the rows with status='A' the same as those with MAX(date_appoved) ? –  ypercube Nov 22 '11 at 16:01
    
you mean in that case it will fall into the "ELSE" clause right...? well in that case then yes, but what i mean is that isn't it redundant to put the status = 'A' in the WHERE clause and then compare status to 'A' in the subTable –  user1060096 Nov 22 '11 at 16:06
    
@ypercube - yes the date_approved is in the same table as the status. not sure what you mean by the 'same' though.. –  user1060096 Nov 22 '11 at 16:09
    
@user1060096: No, it's not redundant. The redundancy is the (unneeded) correlated subquery. One way to avoid it, is Luis' solution. –  ypercube Nov 22 '11 at 16:11

2 Answers 2

try this

ALTER VIEW dbo.st_review_status_vw AS (
SELECT c.st_id, c.ms_price_comp_fy, 

    CASE WHEN MIN(status)  = 'A' THEN 'C'
    ELSE 'I'
    END AS status,

MAX(date_approved) AS date_completed
FROM ms_price_comp AS c
GROUP BY c.st_id, c.ms_price_comp_fy
)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. It works because 'A' < 'N' –  ypercube Nov 22 '11 at 16:03
    
thanks @ypercube, in other case can be min(case when .... –  Luis Siquot Nov 22 '11 at 16:06
    
MIN() can be used with text fields: MIN('A', 'N', 'N', NULL) = 'A'. –  ypercube Nov 22 '11 at 16:18
    
Nice, it works! –  user1060096 Nov 22 '11 at 16:22
    
Thanks so much guys!!! Thread solved! :-) –  user1060096 Nov 22 '11 at 16:30

This looks to be the same to me

ALTER VIEW dbo.st_review_status_vw AS (
SELECT
        c.st_id
    ,   c.ms_price_comp_fy
    ,   CASE
            WHEN MIN(status) = 'A' THEN 'C'
            ELSE 'I'
        END AS status
    ,   MAX(date_approved) AS date_completed
FROM ms_price_comp AS c
GROUP BY c.st_id, c.ms_price_comp_fy
)
share|improve this answer
1  
No, this is not equivalent. –  ypercube Nov 22 '11 at 15:58
    
There could me more than one rows with same st_id and ms_price_comp_fy. The WHEN status = 'A' will test an arbitary row from them. –  ypercube Nov 22 '11 at 16:07

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