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I am relatively new to ruby, and I've been amazed with some of the Gems available. Sinatra comes to mind (one of the simplest ways to create working RESTful interfaces I've ever seen).

So I was wondering, what are some of the coolest or most amazing Gems my fellow programmers have found, that a newbie Ruby guy should look at. Im not looking to solve a specific problem I am having, it more about getting answers to a problem I never knew I had (if you follow my meaning).

What are your suggestions?

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16 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I'm of the "don't get it until you need it" philosophy.

That said, there are a couple gems that I keep using:

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2  
Hpricot (and Nokogiri) are fantastic. Definitely my first choice for any HTML scraping/manipulation. –  overthink May 13 '09 at 18:55
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Check out http://ruby-toolbox.com/. They categorize ruby projects and break them down by most watched projects on GitHub. Pretty useful for finding good gems within each problem domain.

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General
  • Rake — This should come pre-installed with rubygems, must have tool
  • DaemonsRun ruby code as a daemon
  • HamlAwesome alternative to raw HTML
  • HpricotHTML parser
  • RdiscountMarkdown parser
  • CapistranoVery nice deployment tool
Testing
  • RspecTesting framework
  • CucumberIntegration testing
  • Factory-girlFixtures replacement
  • Autotest — Runs your tests in the background
Rails plugins
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Here are some of my favorites:

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Ramaze is ramazing. If you like Sinatra, you may like Ramaze even more. Sinatra gets all the press these days but Ramaze has actually been around longer.

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I found Ramaze strange when looking at it... so I'll stick with Sinatra, thanks. –  Robert K May 13 '09 at 18:00
    
Sure but, out of curiosity, what do you mean by 'strange'? –  emo May 13 '09 at 19:18
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Sinatra is the simplest way to make a web app with Ruby.

EDIT: Code sample:

require "sinatra"
get '/' do
    "Hello, world!"
end
get '/:name/?' do
    "Hello, #{params[:name]}!"
end

In this case, running your program and then going to / will output Hello, world and /dave, with or without a trailing slash, would output Hello, dave!

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easier than camping? (haven't used either, yet, so I'm actually curious) –  jess May 21 '09 at 22:04
    
I'm not sure. I can't tell from any of the samples on the site. I'll add a sampling here. –  Lucas Jones May 22 '09 at 15:38
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I've been using Mechanize a lot lately. It comes in handy more often than you might realize initially. Wirble is also amazing.

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  • rake
  • autotest (zentest)
  • rspec
  • shoulda
  • cucumber
  • webrat
  • machinist
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The ones the READMEs of the projects you're using tells you to install.

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  • rak: search for a string pattern in your code
  • rcov: code coverage statistics for your tests, in nice html
  • flay and flog: to see which parts of your code suck the most
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  • shoulda
  • zentest
  • redgreen
  • rcov
  • passenger

and of course:

  • json
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Friendly_id It allows you to create pretty URL’s and work with human-friendly strings as if they were numeric ids for ActiveRecord models.

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fastthread, rails, sinatra, my own gem, rspec all come to mind.

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[whenever] - define cron tasks in ruby DSL

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so not an answer –  Michael Durrant Jun 22 '12 at 16:29
    
it so is an answer. whenever is a ruby gem and the question asks for ruby gems. –  Jauco Jan 11 at 13:43
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My Gems in June 2012 for rails 3.2+


All Projects

Views

  • Haml - Cleaner view code
  • simple_form - Forms made much easier.

Database

  • mysql2 - MySQL
  • pg - Postgres

Testing

  • Rspec - Framework
  • Factory-girl — Fixtures replacement
  • Guard — Runs your tests in the background

Authentication

  • Devise - Authorization and authentication framework
  • Cancan - Roles

As needed

  • friendly_id for SEO url's
  • hapricot for XML parsing
  • will_paginate for view paging
  • acts_as_list for data structures
  • shoulda for test matchers
  • cuvumber for user language testing
  • nokogiri - XML parsing

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