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Let's say you have the following class:

class A {
    private Foo foo = new Foo();
    Foo getFoo() {
        return foo; //foo.clone()?
    }
    void modifyFoo() {
        //modify this.foo
        //...
    }
}

I want to allow:

  • either multiple threads to call getFoo()
  • or one thread to call modifyFoo(),
  • once a thread wants to modify foo, no other new getFoo() calls arriving after that may be executed, until modification is done.

Are there classes already for this problem in Java or do I have to implement it? If I have to implement it, then how do I implement it ensure thread safety?

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It sounds like what you're looking for is a Read-Write lock, fortunately, java provides one, ReentrantReadWriteLock. You can use it as follows:

class A {
    private ReentrantReadWriteLock lock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
    private Foo foo = new Foo();
    Foo getFoo() {
        lock.readLock().lock();
        try {
            Foo tmp = foo; //foo.clone()?
        } finally {
            lock.readLock().unlock();
        }
        return tmp;
    }
    void modifyFoo() {
        lock.writeLock().lock();
        try {
            //modify this.foo
            //...
        } finally {
            lock.writeLock().unlock();
        }
    }
}

This will allow any number of threads to call getFoo() simultaneously, but only one to call modifyFoo(). When modify foo is called, the thread will block until all read locks are released, then begin executing and prevent any new read locks from being acquired until it has finished. There are still concurrency issues to consider since the returned Foo can be modified by the code that calls getFoo, but this should provide the basic tool you need.

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You put foo.clone() as a comment, but I think it's necessary. The code that gets Foo will probably then access its fields and those might be read in an inconsistent state if modifyFoo is called in another thread. And the lock is of no help here. –  toto2 Nov 22 '11 at 16:37
    
That is true if you want to guarantee that it will be in a consistent state, however I simply wanted to demonstrate the necessary locking mechanism with as few alterations to the code as possible. There are situations in which the code as written could be correct however, if, for example, foo is never modified in place, but only ever assigned an entirely new value. In the general case, though, yes, cloning foo would be a safer option. –  nonVirtualThunk Nov 22 '11 at 16:43
    
Agreed. I know you did mention there are other concurrency issues to consider. I wanted to make clear to @SolidSun that there is a lot to think about (very carefully) when dealing with concurrency. –  toto2 Nov 22 '11 at 16:59
    
Note: it is extremelly bad practice not to use a finally block surrounding a call to unlock(). You can easily blow up all your system without it. Edited and fixed. –  Bruno Reis Nov 22 '11 at 20:35
    
Definitely so, sorry for the oversight, and thank you for the edit –  nonVirtualThunk Nov 22 '11 at 20:37
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You should use a ReentrantReadWriteLock. Multiple threads can read, one thread can write which blocks all reads.

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class A {
    private volatile Foo foo = new Foo();
    Foo getFoo() {
        return foo; //foo.clone()?
    }
    void synchronized modifyFoo() {
        //modify this.foo
        //...
    }
}

The synchronized keyword ensures that modifyFoo() is atomic, that is, won't allow multiple threads to invoke it at once. The volatile keyword ensures that reads to foo do not return a cached version (which could have been outdated if another thread modified it) and instead returns the current, correct value.

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1  
It gets tricky here though. Despite having Foo foo being volatile, it doesn't ensure that all fields of Foo are volatile. That means foo.getField() may return stale data (of whatever is returned from getField()) despite it being set in modifyFoo. I would recommend having both methods being synchronized –  John Vint Nov 22 '11 at 16:19
1  
@JohnVint - but even that doesn't save you if the Foo class isn't also protected by synchronization as after two threads call getFoo() they each have a reference and can step on each other. –  Brian Roach Nov 22 '11 at 16:22
    
I know about the synchronized keyword, but what if getFoo() isn't atomic either, but it makes no modification, and it is permissible to allow multiple threads to call getFoo() at the same time if no thread is calling modifyFoo()? –  SolidSun Nov 22 '11 at 16:22
    
Sure. volatile solves that issue. –  Travis Webb Nov 22 '11 at 16:24
    
@Brian Roach good point. I guess my point was more of the loss of the happens-before relationship between invoking modifyFoo() and invoking getFoo(). But you are right, this example is only as thread-safe as Foo is. –  John Vint Nov 22 '11 at 16:24
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You should be able to get by with a synchronized block.

class A {
    private Foo foo = new Foo();

    Foo getFoo() {
        return foo;
    }

    void modifyFoo() {
        synchronized(foo){
            /* do your modify stuff */
        }
    }
}
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