Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What is the easiest and most SQL-like way to insert textbox values into a SQL Server table? I found several ways, and all of them are too complicated for this simple thing I want to do.

share|improve this question
4  
can you give some examples of what you have found? – Robert Nov 22 '11 at 16:14
1  
    
@elninho is that too complicated? – huMpty duMpty Nov 22 '11 at 16:37
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If LINQ is too foreign for you, you can still do things the old-fashioned way:

string statement = "INSERT INTO mytable(mycolumn) VALUES (@text)";
SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(statement);
command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@text", myTextBox.Text);

try{
    SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(myConnectionString);
    connection.Open();
    command.Connection = connection;
    command.ExecuteNonQuery();
} catch {
    //do exception handling stuff
}

Edit: Here's another version that uses using to ensure that messes are cleaned up:

string statement = "INSERT INTO mytable(mycolumn) VALUES (@text)";

using(SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(statement))
using(SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(myConnectionString)) {
    try{
        command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@text", myTextBox.Text);
        connection.Open();
        command.Connection = connection;
        command.ExecuteNonQuery();
    } catch {
        //do exception handling stuff
   }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 almost perfect - uses straight SQL, parametrized query - only gripe is: you should put SqlConnection and SqlCommand into using(SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(...)) blocks to make sure they get properly disposed. ALso the Parameters.AddWithValue is OK but can be dangerous at times - I prefer to specifically define the SqlDbType to avoid any surprises..... – marc_s Nov 22 '11 at 16:26
    
Agreed 100% on all suggestions. I just wanted to keep the example simple so that it didn't overwhelm the OP. – ean5533 Nov 22 '11 at 16:30
    
the using-thingy should not confuse, better to drop the try-catch in that case..? +1 if you put in the using statement. – vidstige Nov 22 '11 at 19:36
    
@vidstige try/catch is a much more well-known concept than using. There is no equivalent to using in Java, for example. I put up an example with it anyway. – ean5533 Nov 22 '11 at 20:09
    
this has nothing to do with java, but alright. on a side note - avoid catching all exception like this catch since it might hide serious problems with your program and is therefore considered bad practice. Instead catch a more specific exception. – vidstige Nov 22 '11 at 20:54

If you want to do something quickly, use LINQ to SQL. It will take care of your Data Access Layer & Business objects.

Just go to LINQ to SQL Classes on Visual Studio & map your SQL server and add any tables you want to it.

Then you can use the objects it creates in your code behind to update values from textboxes.

http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2007/05/19/using-linq-to-sql-part-1.aspx

share|improve this answer
public string ConnectionString
{
    get
    {
        //Reading connection string from web.config
        return ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ConnectionName"].ConnectionString;
    }
}

public bool InsertEmployee()
{
    bool isSaved = false;
    int numberOfRowsAffected = 0;
    string query = @"INSERT INTO Employee(EmployeeName, EmailAddress)
                        VALUES (@EmployeeName, @EmailAddress);
                        SELECT @@IDENTITY AS RowEffected";
    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();
    cmd.CommandText = query;
    cmd.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text;
    cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@EmployeeName", txtEmployeeName.Text));
    cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@EmailAddress", txtEmailAddress.Text));
    try
    {
        using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString))
        {
            cmd.Connection = cn;
            cn.Open();
            object result = cmd.ExecuteScalar();
            isSaved = Convert.ToInt32(result) > 0 ? true : false;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        isSaved = false;
    }
    return isSaved;
}

But, in multiple layer or multi-tier application you do need to create DTO(Data Transfer Object) to pass the data from layer to layer(or tier to tier)

share|improve this answer

Here's a simple way to do it. It looks complex because of the number of rows: Inserting Data in SQL Database

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.