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I am confused between these two functions:

void Swap_byPointer1(int *x, int *y){
    int *temp=new int;
    temp=x;
    x=y;
    y=temp;
}

void Swap_byPointer2(int *x, int *y){
    int *temp=new int;
    *temp=*x;
    *x=*y;
    *y=*temp;
}

Why Swap_byPointer2 succeeds to swap between x and y, and Swap_byPointer1does not?

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4  
+1 for a well-formatted question. –  John Dibling Nov 22 '11 at 16:32
11  
version 1 is a noop and a memory leak. version 2 is only a memory leak. –  PlasmaHH Nov 22 '11 at 16:33
    
The memory leak is caused by the unnecessary new int. –  Thomas Matthews Nov 22 '11 at 16:40
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first snippet swaps the memory addresses which are the values of the pointers. Since the pointers are local copies, this has no effect for the caller.

Rewritten without a memory leak:

void Swap_byPointer1(int *x, int *y){
    //e.g x = 0xDEADBEEF and y = 0xCAFEBABE;
    int *temp=x;
    x=y;
    y=temp;
    //now x = 0xCAFEBABE and y = 0xDEADBEEF
}

The second swaps the pointees (objects that the pointers point to).

Rewritten without a memory leak:

void Swap_byPointer2(int *x, int *y){
    //e.g *x = 100 and *y = 200
    int temp =*x;
    *x=*y;
    *y=temp;
    //now *x = 200 and *y = 100
    //there are now different values at the original memory locations
}

(Pointers can point to dynamically allocated objects, but don't have to. Using a pointer does not mean there has to be a new-allocation. Pointers can point to objects with automatic lifetime as well.)

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2  
One note, because it may not be obvious to the OP. x and y are local to the functions, any changes on x and y are purely contained within the function and do not affect the outer world. This is what happens in the first function. On the other hand, the second function changes what x and y point to, which does affect the outer world. –  Matthieu M. Nov 22 '11 at 19:21
    
Thanx I see the point now. –  Aan Nov 23 '11 at 7:50
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In your first function you're swapping the pointers themselves, and in the second you're swapping the values of what the pointers point to, ie pointers dereferenced.

If you want to change what a pointer points to, you should pass a pointer to a pointer (ie int**x) and change the second pointer.

Like so

void Swap_byPointer1(int **x, int **y){
    int *temp;
    temp=*x;
    *x=*y;
    *y=*temp;
}
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10  
Also, both have a memory leak –  Mooing Duck Nov 22 '11 at 16:33
    
you don't swap what the pointers point to, you only swap the local copies, the original passed pointers are unchanged. –  PlasmaHH Nov 22 '11 at 16:34
    
If you swap what they point to then after swap they would point to the other pointer's previous location, meaning it should still work. –  sim642 Nov 22 '11 at 16:34
    
@UncleBens Yes, mistake in my answer –  Tony The Lion Nov 22 '11 at 16:37
    
In both examples, there is no need for new int. Just declare the integer or the pointer to integer. C++ is not like Java nor C# in this respect. –  Thomas Matthews Nov 22 '11 at 16:40
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Initial setup of the functions, (common for both) (mock values)

(Assumption : The values written outside the boxes are address.)

enter image description here

Function swap_byPointer1,

enter image description here

Function swapby_Pointer2,

enter image description here

Hope this helped to get a picture of whats happening, Cheers!

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2  
+1 for the effort –  Alessandro Teruzzi Nov 22 '11 at 17:13
    
@Sanjay: +1 a lot of thanx. –  Aan Nov 23 '11 at 7:43
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Because the parameters are passed by value. In the first code sample all you do is swap local copies of the pointers. The second example actually writes to the pointees.

Better still would be to use pass by reference and avoid heap allocation by using a stack allocated temp int.

void SwapByRef(int &x, int &y)
{
    int temp=x;     
    x=y;     
    y=temp;
}
....
int x=1;
int y=2;
SwapByRef(x, y);

As others have pointed out, both of your code samples leak memory because temp is never deleted. For a simple int like this, just use a stack allocated local int variable for your temp.

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The first function is just reassigning the local copy of pointers, not modifying the underlying values. When it returns, it will have had no effect (other than allocating a new int)

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