Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my case. I have the following script:

<?php
// ... other code ...
switch($_GET['request'])    {
        case "firstPage":
            $file = APP_ROOT. "pages/firstPage.php";
            $hndle = fopen($file,"r");
            $right_column = fread($hndle, filesize($file));
            fclose($hndle);
            break;
        case "secondPage":
            $file = APP_ROOT. "pages/secondPage.php";
            $hndle = fopen($file,"r");
            $right_column = fread($hndle, filesize($file));
            fclose($hndle);
            break;
    }
}
?>
<div id="right_column">
    <?php echo $right_column;?>
</div>
// ... other code ...

Depending on the value of the $_GET['request'] I am assigning to the variable $right_column the content of a php file. Then, I echo that variable in the last div. The firstPage.php and secondPage.php files contain mixed html and php code. I look for a solution like the 'partial' in Zend. Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
What is the problem here, what is the question? –  Chris Nov 22 '11 at 16:46
    
@Chris: Sorry, tried to find a solution because my post had more than 250 characters. –  Ginger Opariti Nov 22 '11 at 16:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It would probably be simpler if you set a variable indicating which PHP file to include, and then rather than reading the file, just include it. For example:

<?php
// ... other code ...
switch($_GET['request'])    {
        case "firstPage":
            $file = APP_ROOT. "pages/firstPage.php";
            break;
        case "secondPage":
            $file = APP_ROOT. "pages/secondPage.php";
            break;
    }
}
?>
<div id="right_column">
    <?php include($file);?>
</div>
// ... other code ...

If your firstPage.php and secondPage.php files only had HTML, what you're doing would work. If it has PHP, then you'll need to include() it; or you could eval() it but that is again doing more work than you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Common sense, there is a huge backlog of questions with this subject, the solution was handy but amazingly, nobody saw it, including myself! –  Ginger Opariti Nov 22 '11 at 17:03

First of all , your code is horrible, it should be something like :

$pages = array(
   'firstPage'   => 'pages/firstPage.php',
   'secondPage'  => 'pages/secondPage.php'
);

$request = 'firstPage';
if ( array_key_exits($_GET, 'request') 
 &&  array_key_exists($pages, $_GET['request']) )
{
   $request = $_GET['request'];
}
?>
<div id="right_column">
    <?php include  APP_ROOT . $pages[ $request ]; ?>
</div>

An please read http://codeangel.org/articles/simple-php-template-engine.html , you might find this interesting. It should explain to you , how you can easily take advantage of php's native templating capabilities.

share|improve this answer
    
your comment, in essence in line with the others above, reminds me of the early competitions to write the most unreadable C code possible. You have your point of view but I'm skeptical to reply on your 'horrible' attribute. ;-) though ... –  Ginger Opariti Nov 22 '11 at 17:14
    
@GingerOpariti , then try adding 12 different pages in your version .. and forget empty request parameter in url. –  tereško Nov 22 '11 at 17:23
    
+1 This is definitely better than an ever expanding switch statement. –  Steve Fenton Nov 23 '11 at 10:09

Actually, reading and dumping your file is not a solution. You are just displaying code to your end-user.

What you need is parse the PHP file and display the result. You can do it in 2 ways:

First, intead of

 $file = APP_ROOT. "pages/firstPage.php";
 $hndle = fopen($file,"r");
 $right_column = fread($hndle, filesize($file));
 fclose($hndle);

You can do:

$right_column = include(APP_ROOT . "pages/firstPage.php");

So, your firstPage.php must RETURN the code. Something like this:

// firstPage.php
return "my html";

But you also can include it like this:

<div id="right_column">
    <?php include(APP_ROOT . "pages/firstPage.php"); ?>
</div>

Or, you can use the ob_get_contents. PHP has a nice documentation about how to use it.

I'd use include for your case.

share|improve this answer

It seems to me that you could program by convention rather than have an ever increasing switch statement:

<?php
// ... other code ...

$file = '';
if (isset($_GET['request'])) {
    $safeFileName = sanitizeRequestForFileName($_GET['request']);
    $file = APP_ROOT. 'pages/' . $safeFileName . '.php';
}
?>
<div id="right_column">
    <?php 
        if (file_exists($file)) {
            include($file);
        }
    ?>
</div>
// ... other code ...
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure that including a file just because it exists is the best idea ? There can be a lot of things inside $_GET['request']. –  tereško Nov 22 '11 at 17:26
    
This is extremely insecure. What if $_GET['request'] === ../uploads/hacker_script? Oops. –  Chris Nov 22 '11 at 18:24
    
@Chris that really isn't a reason to avoid programming by convention. You would simply write a method to sanitize the input, or use a store such as tereško's answer if you want to lock down the options. I just believe it is better if you don't need to change your code each time you want to add an extra option. –  Steve Fenton Nov 23 '11 at 10:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.