Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to call a method on a class to sort data of a datatype that is unknown until the method is called.

Here is the code for the sort procedure that tries to call the generic method:

public void Sort(LiteTableColumn column, LiteSortOrder sortOrder)
{
    column.Sort(sortOrder);

    //create an array of the values
    object[] values = new object[_rowCount];
    for (int i = 0; i < _rowCount; i++)
    {
        values[i] = this.GetValue(column.Index, i);
    }

    Type sortType = typeof(QuickSort<>);
    Type constructedClass = sortType.MakeGenericType(Type.GetType("System." + column.DataType));

    object created = Activator.CreateInstance(constructedClass);
    _sortKey = (int[])sortType.GetMethod("Sort").MakeGenericMethod(Type.GetType("System." + column.DataType)).Invoke(constructedClass, new object[] { values });
}

I am getting an error on this line:

_sortKey = (int[])sortType.GetMethod("Sort").MakeGenericMethod(Type.GetType("System." + column.DataType)).Invoke(constructedClass, new object[] { values });

Error:

{"Int32[] Sort(T[], Test_SQL_Stream.LiteObjects.LiteSortOrder) is not a GenericMethodDefinition. MakeGenericMethod may only be called on a method for which MethodBase.IsGenericMethodDefinition is true."}

I'm not sure why exactly this is happening. Could it be because my QuickSort class has T : IComparable?

Here is the QuickSort class

public class QuickSort<T> where T : IComparable
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Sorts a given array of data in an ascending/descending fashion
    /// </summary>
    public QuickSort()
    {

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Sorts the items in an order specifies & returns an index that reflects the sorted values
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sortArray">The array of values to sort (must implement IComparable)</param>
    /// <param name="direction">The order to sort. Unsorted is not a valid parameter</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public int[] Sort(T[] sortArray, LiteSortOrder direction)
    {
        int rows = sortArray.Length;
        int[] index = new int[rows];

        //populate the index
        for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++)
        {
            index[i] = i;
        }

        //raise an error in case the sort direction is set at unsorted and return the original list
        if (direction == LiteSortOrder.Unsorted)
        {
            new InvalidOperationException("Unable to sort items in: LiteSortOrder.Unsorted order");
            return index;
        }

        //sort the values
        quickSort(sortArray, index, 0, rows - 1);

        //if it should be descending order, reverse the items order
        if (direction == LiteSortOrder.Descending)
        {
            int t;
            int i1 = 0;
            int i2 = rows - 1;

            while (i1 < i2)
            {
                t = index[i1];
                index[i1] = index[i2];
                index[i2] = t;
                i1++;
                i2--;
            }
        }

        //return the sorted index
        return index;
    }

    private static void quickSort(T[] List, int[] RefList, int StartIdx, int EndIdx)
    {
        int Lo, Hi, T;
        T Mid;

        Lo = StartIdx;
        Hi = EndIdx;
        Mid = List[RefList[(Lo + Hi) / 2]];

        do
        {
            while (List[RefList[Lo]].CompareTo(Mid) < 0) Lo++;
            while (List[RefList[Hi]].CompareTo(Mid) > 0) Hi--;
            if (Lo <= Hi)
            {
                T = RefList[Lo];
                RefList[Lo] = RefList[Hi];
                RefList[Hi] = T;
                Lo++;
                Hi--;
            }
        } while (Lo <= Hi);
        if (Hi > StartIdx) quickSort(List, RefList, StartIdx, Hi);
        if (Lo < EndIdx) quickSort(List, RefList, Lo, EndIdx);
    }
}

EDIT: So after the comments about using Array.Sort, I looked into this method further. It is MUCH faster than my quicksort method (which I tested using strings instead of generics):

For those of you who would like to know, here are the results:

Populate Strings:159ms
Populate Objects: 53ms
Array.Sort w/Key: 10ms
Array.Sort w/o Key: 229ms
QuickSort w/strings: 231ms

and the code:

watch.Start();
        string[] values = new string[_rowCount];
        for (int i = 0; i < _rowCount; i++)
        {
            if (this.GetValue(column.Index, i) != null)
                values[i] = this.GetValue(column.Index, i).ToString();
            else
                values[i] = "";
        }
        Debug.WriteLine("Populate Strings:" +watch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
        watch.Reset();
        watch.Start();
        object[] objVal = new object[_rowCount];

        for (int i = 0; i < _rowCount; i++)
        {
            _sortKey[i] = i;
            objVal[i] = this.GetValue(column.Index, i);
        }
        Debug.WriteLine("Populate Objects: " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
        watch.Reset();
        watch.Start();
        Array.Sort(_sortKey, objVal);
        Debug.WriteLine("Array.Sort w/Key: " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
        watch.Reset();
        watch.Start();
        Array.Sort(objVal);
        Debug.WriteLine("Array.Sort w/o Key: " +watch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
        watch.Reset();
        watch.Start();
        QuickSort sorter = new QuickSort();
        sorter.Sort(values, LiteSortOrder.Ascending);
        Debug.WriteLine("QuickSort w/strings: " + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
share|improve this question
    
I would suggest doing this with an interface that each class must implement rather than using a "dynamic generic". –  mydogisbox Nov 22 '11 at 16:54
    
Type.GetType is slow and should be avoided where possible. –  SLaks Nov 22 '11 at 16:54
1  
Why don't you call Array.Sort? –  SLaks Nov 22 '11 at 16:56
    
Why do you have your own Quicksort class? –  McKay Nov 22 '11 at 16:57
    
@ChandlerPelhams: But once you create that array, you can call Array.Sort; you don't need your QuickSort class. –  SLaks Nov 22 '11 at 18:13
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your Sort method is a non-generic method on a generic class.

MakeGenericMethod can only be called on generic methods – methods that themselves take a generic parameter.
Once you construct the closed generic QuickSort<Something> type, Sort is a normal method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that makes sense –  ChandlerPelhams Nov 22 '11 at 17:16
add comment

The Sort function is not generic. It is merely inside a generic class, but it is not generic itself. Hence:

 _sortKey = (int[])sortType.GetMethod("Sort").Invoke(constructedClass, new object[] { values });
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.