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I would like to know which of the following is better to use, or is generally better:

<img src = "foo.png" height = 32 width = 32 />

OR

<img src = "foo.png" style = "height: 32px; width: 32px;" />
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

the latter is better (and more up2date).

<img src="foo.png" style="height:32px; width:32px;" />
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You don't have to close image tags, not in HTML. – gryzzly Nov 22 '11 at 17:17
    
gryzzly, you missed the initial pun on the post before it was edited. The /> was missing, hence the closure pun. – Jan Højriis Dragsbaek Nov 22 '11 at 20:20

If you want to keep it clean, never put a style attribute on any HTML tag. Always use an external CSS file. Use an ID or use a class, as they are intended for this. If you suddenly need to change something that's present on 50 HTML elements, you'll curse the day you decided to do them all inline instead of giving them all a class and defining the values for that class in an external css file. Because editing one line in a CSS file is a lot easier than finding all 50 of them in the HTML file.

Also, always enclose your attributes in either single or double quotation marks. This is a best-practice.

Also, always close your tags. I seriously cannot believe someone would, in this day and age, casually say you don't need to close your tags in HTML.

You don't have to, it's true. But I really thought we had all moved past that point of laziness.

So, my recommendation is you use this: <img src="foo.png" height="32" width="32" />
Also, there is no need whatsoever to put spaces before or after you = sign.

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