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I have an IList<Price> SelectedPrices. I also have an IEnumerable<Price> that gets retrieved at a later date. I would like to add everything from the latter to the former where the former does NOT contain the primary key defined in the latter. So for instance:

IList<Price> contains Price.ID = 1, Price.ID = 2, and IEnumerable<Price> contains Price.ID = 2, Price.ID = 3, and Price.ID = 4. What's the easiest way to use a lambda to add those items so that I end up with the IList containing 4 unique Prices? I know I have to call ToList() on the IList to get access to the AddRange() method so that I can add multiple items at once, but how do I select only the items that DON'T exist in that list from the enumerable?

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(note that to get angle brackets to appear correctly they must be formatted-as-code, either in back ticks or with a four-space indent. The {} button in the editor will do the right thing to selected text, to format it as code) –  AakashM Nov 22 '11 at 17:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know I have to call ToList() on the IList to get access to the AddRange() method

This is actually not safe. This will create a new List<T>, so you won't add the items to your original IList<T>. You'll need to add them one at a time.

The simplest option is just to loop and use a contains:

var itemsToAdd = enumerablePrices.Where(p => !SelectedPrices.Any(sel => sel.ID == p.ID));
foreach(var item in itemsToAdd)
{
    SelectedPrices.Add(item);
}

However, this is going to be quadratic in nature, so if the collections are very large, it may be slow. Depending on how large the collections are, it might actually be better to build a set of the IDs in advance:

var existing = new HashSet<int>(SelectedPrices.Select(p => p.ID));
var itemsToAdd = enumerablePrices.Where(p => !existing.Contains(p.ID));
foreach(var item in itemsToAdd)
{
    SelectedPrices.Add(item);
}

This will prevent the routine from going quadratic if your collection (SelectedPrices) is large.

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I see. So the Where -> Any selector will map all IDs in both lists thus forcing the quadratic? The second piece of code seems just as readable regardless. –  user623647 Nov 22 '11 at 17:41
    
@user623647 Yes - The .Any is going to be O(n) for n "SelectedPrice" instances. This makes it O(n*m) for N elements in the enumerable and M elements in the list. The second option becomes linear, instead, but has a higher overhead to setup the hash set initially. If the collections are always small, I'd just use the first - but if the SelectedPrices can be large, the second will prevent you from going quadratic. –  Reed Copsey Nov 22 '11 at 17:43
    
Thank you very much, Reed. –  user623647 Nov 22 '11 at 20:30

You can try that:

var newPrices = prices.Where(p => !SelectedPrices.Any(sp => sp.ID == p.ID));
foreach(var p in newPrices)
    SelectedPrices.Add(p);

I know I have to call ToList() on the IList to get access to the AddRange() method so that I can add multiple items at once

ToList will create a new instance of List<Price>, so you will be modifying another list, not the original one... No, you need to add the items one by one.

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Ah, that makes sense. I was hoping to get out of the foreach but this is perfect. Thank you. –  user623647 Nov 22 '11 at 17:28

Try yourEnumerable.Where(x => !yourList.Any(y => y.ID == x.ID)) for the selection part of your question.

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If you want to add new elements to the existing list and do that in a most performant way you should probably do it in a conventional way. Like this:

    IList<Price> selectedPrices = ...;
    IEnumerable<Price> additionalPrices = ...;

    IDictionary<int, Price> pricesById = new Dictionary<int, Price>();

    foreach (var price in selectedPrices) 
    { 
        pricesById.Add(price.Id, price); 
    }


    foreach (var price in additionalPrices)
    {
        if (!pricesById.ContainsKey(price.Id))
        {
            selectedPrices.Add(price);
        }
    }
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