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I have a MVC3 application to which I've added a couple of simple cache variables as a property. I add my data in Application_Start and then later in a controller try to cast the HttpContext.ApplicationInstance back to my type to access it. But, the property is always null. Here's an example:

EDITED TO WORKING EXAMPLE

public interface IMyMvcApp
{
    Hashtable Cache {get;set;}
}


public class MvcApplication: HttpApplication, IMyMvcApp
{

    public Hashtable Cache 
    {
        get { return Context.Cache["MyStuff"] as Hashtable; }
        set { Context.Cache["MyStuff"] = value}
    }

    public void Application_Start()
    {
        Cache = new Hashtable();
        Cache.Add("key", new object());
    }
}

public class AController : Controller
{
    protected override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context)
    {
        var myApp = context.HttpContext.ApplicationInstance as IMyMvcApp;

        Assert.IsNotNull(myApp.Cache);
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are multiple instances of the application created by the framework. To verify this add an empty constructor and put a breakpoint in it. You will see that this constructor will be hit multiple times whereas the Application_Start only once.

So instead of reinventing wheels you should use the Cache object that's already built into the framework:

protected void Application_Start()
{
    ...
    Context.Cache["key"] = new object();
}

and then:

protected override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context)
{
    var value = context.HttpContext.Cache["key"];
}
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I remember now, my implementation of the mvc app just hit the cache in the get accessor. doh –  scottm Nov 22 '11 at 17:32
    
Using the cache is usually not the appropriate storage place for application long lived objects. A static field or property on any class, like on the Application class might be more accurate. –  citykid Jan 23 at 17:44

In addition to Darin's correct answer recommending the builtin cache, a note on Singletons in Asp.Net.

MvcApplication is NOT a singleton

Contrary to very widespread belief, MvcApplication is NOT a global singleton. The class is instantiated several times, one instance per "pipeline", so the performance counter "pipeline instance count" tells you how many instances of MvcApplication are currently consdidered alive. Add a default ctor and prove this yourself:

public MvcApplication()
{
    Trace.WriteLine(this.GetHashCode());
}

Debug break the line or watch the various hash codes in DebugViewer. To force pipeline instance count going up create a method with Thread.Sleep(5000), Asp.Net will then fire up a new instance once you make another http request in parallel.

Solution - How to instantiate singletons in Asp.Net applications (MVC or WebForms)

If your MvcApplication class however has an Application_Start() method then this method is called in fact only once, process wide. This allows adding static fields to MvcApplication and access them.

These fields are then accessed by

MvcApplication.MySingleValue
  • obviously.

HttpApplication weirdness

The design of the HttpApplication class and its events is quite strange, which presumably has its reason in some loose sort of backwards design compatibility to very old COM based ASP pages. There the application object was in fact created only once, which is surely the origin of the wrong belief related to Asp.Net. An example of the HttpApplication strangeness:

protected void Application_Start()
{
}

Note that there is no override involved!

In summary, the application instances might be of minor interest most of the time, I can see no scenario were it could become relevant to hold state, as its state would be shared by an arbitrary subset of requests handled. So accessing it in the completely fine way as mentioned by Matt might not be required too often.

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