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I'm writing a task-execution engine and I'm running into some questions about what is the appropriate way to insure that everything is properly released when I'm using Castle.Windsor (ver 2.5.1.0) in a Task-Parallels-Library system.

I've included a highly simplified pseudo-code example of what I'm doing at the end of the post.

Here are my questions

  • Castle.Windsor does not have a "PerTask" lifestyle and given the way the TPL uses threads, I believe the PerThread lifestyle won't work. So what is the appropriate lifestyle?
  • If I force TPL to be a Task-Per-Thread mechanism, it's my understanding that calling Release on a PerThread lifestyle won't actually release anything until the container is disposed of, and currently I only have a single container that lives forever. Is there a better way to set up my containers to support PerThread?
  • In the example below, I've also indicated three potential places where I can call release on the container. According to most of what I've read, I should rarely need to call release myself, but if I don't call it at those places, how do those registrations get disposed of?

The Service:

class Service : ServiceBase
{
    IWindsorContainer _container; 
    Engine _engine; 

    public Service()
    {
        _container = new WindsorContainer();
        _container.Register(Component.For<Engine>().ImplementedBy<Engine>().LifeStyle.Singleton);
        _container.Register(Component.For<ISession>().UsingFactoryMethod(() => SessionFactory.Get()); 
        _container.Register(Component.For<IDataAccess>().ImplementedBy<SqlDataAccess>());
        _container.Register(Component.For<IWorker>().ImplementedBy<DocumentWorker>()); 
        _container.Register(Component.For<IDependency>().ImplementedBy<SomeDependency>()); 
    }

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        _engine = _container.Resolve<Engine>(); 
        _engine.Start(); 
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
        _container.Release(_engine);  //1?
    }
}

The "Engine":

class Engine
{
    IWindsorContainer _container 
    public Engine(IWindsorContainer container) 
    {
        _container = container; 
    } 

    public void Start()
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Work()); 
    }

    public void Work()
    {
        var worker = _container.Resolve<IWorker>(); 
        worker.DoWork(); 
        _container.Release(worker); //2? 
    }
}

A Worker Task:

class Worker : IWorker
{
    IDataAccess _accessor;
    IWindsorContainer _container;
    public Worker(IDataAccess accessor, IWindsorContainer container) 
    { 
        _accessor = accessor; 
        _container = container; 
    }

    public void DoWork()
    {
        var depen = _container.Resolve<IDependency>(); 
        //DoWork
        _container.Release(depen); //3?
    }
}

Thanks, I'll be happy to elaborate further if more detail is needed.

share|improve this question
    
How about registering the components Transient? Then you will receive a new instance everytime you call resolve for the component. –  Simon Nov 22 '11 at 17:42
    
Primarily because, while this example doesn't fully show it, I don't actually want everything to be transient. But it is one possible solution. –  Dugan Nov 22 '11 at 17:58
1  

1 Answer 1

I know in most cases Castle Windsor Recommends 1 Conatiner per app Domain, however you can have as many as you want. There are IOC design Patterns where multiple containers are used, such as 1 container per dll. In this senario you may want one container per thread or process and one for the rest of the application. Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
So them I'm creating and destroying a container every time I create/destroy a Task? –  Dugan Nov 22 '11 at 19:24
    
Yes and this will free up the resources for garbage collection. You would want the creation and destruction of the container within the tasks itself. That would give start fresh and end clean isolation. –  Darren Nov 22 '11 at 19:43

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