Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm experimenting a bit with the Roslyn-CTP.

Currently I'm trying to replace var with the concrete type.

var i=1;

should become:

int i=1;

Figuring out the inferred type is easy. But since this part happens in the semantic model I get a ITypeSymbol. The replacement happens in the syntax model, so I need a TypeSyntax. Since I don't want a bloated name (global::System.Int32), the conversion is context dependent (using, nested types etc.).

The Visual studio version that's part of Roslyn already has this functionality in its "Simplify type name" quickfix, but looking over the samples I couldn't find an easy way to do this conversion.


Based on Kevin Pilch-Bisson's answer I'm now using:

var location = document.GetSyntaxTree().GetLocation(node);
string name = variableType.ToMinimalDisplayString((Location)location, (SemanticModel)document.GetSemanticModel());

A location which ToMinimalDisplayString can be obtained from a CommonSyntaxTree.

An additional complication is that ToMinimalDisplayString requires the classes Location and SemanticModel, whereas document.GetSemanticModel() and CommonSyntaxTree.GetLocation only return an interface.
I worked around by simply casting to the classes, which seems to work for now.

Hmm it looks like the classes are C# specific, and the interfaces language independent.


I've uploaded a working version on github: https://github.com/CodesInChaos/Roslyn

It doesn't work for var in a foreach, but I suspect that's a limitation of the current Roslyn build.

share|improve this question
2  
Re: your last statement: Correct; we did not get var fully implemented in foreach before the CTP build was finalized, sorry. –  Eric Lippert Nov 29 '11 at 17:16
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can get the shortest legal string to represent a symbol at a given location using the ToMinimalDisplayString() extension method that applies to ISymbol (note: It's found in `Roslyn.Compilers.CSharp.SymbolDisplay.

Disclaimer: I work at Microsoft on the Roslyn team.

share|improve this answer
6  
BTW, you don't need a disclaimer when answering questions about your product. Disclaimers should be used if you're recommending your product. –  SLaks Nov 22 '11 at 18:43
    
So how would he prefix that line, Harmless Promotion (of answer, not product)? –  sq33G Nov 22 '11 at 23:20
2  
@sq33G: Unless he's trying to demonstrate that he knows what he's talking bout, he doesn't need that line at all. If he is, he could put it in parentheses. –  SLaks Nov 23 '11 at 0:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.