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according to MSDN, Visual Studio uses a special heap in debug mode that has extra "no man's land" bytes set to 0xFD by default to track heap corruption Is there a way to force visual to break when such values are overwritten? I can't find this information anywhere and it seems extremely useful, much more than having to manually dump the memstat like MSDN proposes

thanks

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Ok I managed to fix some heap corruption problems, but I still have some heap corruption during the "return EXIT_SUCCESS;" line of my program, even thought I do a _ASSERTE( _CrtCheckMemory() ); just before the return. What kind of heap corruption/problem could cause this? –  lezebulon Nov 22 '11 at 21:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try using _CrtSetDbgFlag() when in debug mode.

Reference.

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thanks a lot, it is what I was looking for. Now that I fixed some heap corruption problems, I still have some heap corruption during the "return EXIT_SUCCESS;" line of my program, even thought I do a _ASSERTE( _CrtCheckMemory() ); just before –  lezebulon Nov 22 '11 at 20:51

If you want to pause execution the next time a place in memory is changed then set a data breakpoint. You need to know in advance where the corruption will occur. You maybe need to set a regular break point where a memory is allocated and where no man's land is set to 0xFD. After that point you have a location in memory, and just set the data breakpoint.

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Why don't you use AppVerifier with your application?

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