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Basically I have a few functions that look like this:

class MyClass
{
    void foo()
    {
       using (SomeHelper helper = CreateHelper())
       {
           // Do some stuff with the helper
       }
    }

    void bar()
    {
        using (SomeHelper helper = CreateHelper())
        {
           // Do some stuff with the helper
        }
    }
}

Under the assumption I can use the same resource instead of a different one [instance] in every function is it ok practice in regard to cleanup and such to do this?:

class MyClass
{
    SomeHelper helper = CreateHelper();

    // ...foo and bar that now just use the class helper....

    ~MyClass()
    {
      helper.Dispose();
    }
}
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2  
Instead of using the Finalizer you could instead (if possible) implement IDisposable in MyClass and when Disposing call helper.Dispose –  Chris Walsh Nov 22 '11 at 18:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, do not add a destructor (Finalizer).

You can reuse the resource but then your class has to implement IDisposable.

sealed class MyClass : IDisposable
{
    SomeHelper helper = CreateHelper();

    // ...foo and bar that now just use the class helper....

    //~MyClass()
    public void Dispose()    
    {
      helper.Dispose();
    }                         
}

And now you have to use MyClass instances in a using block. It self has become a managed resource .

A destructor is of no use, whenever a MyClass instance is being collected the associated helper object will also be in the same collection. But having a destructor still incurs considerable overhead.

The standard pattern for IDisposable uses a virtual void Dispose(bool disposing) method but when making the class sealed you can use the minimalistic implementation above.

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Could I trouble you with an explanation of why? (I am assuming by your answer the destructor is a bad idea) –  Joshua Enfield Nov 22 '11 at 18:20
    
Yes, the destructor is expensive and useless. Edited. –  Henk Holterman Nov 22 '11 at 18:22
    
Also Finalizers are not guaranteed to be called at any time in particular, which can subtly break behaviours you expect to work (mostly caused by not realizing finalizers in C# are not like destructors in C++). –  Chris Walsh Nov 22 '11 at 18:26

In .NET you don't know when (or whether) finalizer is called at all.

Instead, explicitly indicate that your class is to be disposed of by implementing IDisposable:
(This is exactly what SomeHelper does)

class MyClass : IDisposable
{
    readonly SomeHelper helper = CreateHelper();

    // any method can use helper

    public void Dispose()
    {
       helper.Dispose();
    }
}

using(var myObj = new MyClass()) {
    // at the end, myObj.Dispose() will trigger helper.Dispose()
}

I used readonly to ensure helper doesn't get re-assigned somewhere else in the class, but this really doesn't matter if you're careful.

You must be extra careful to never set it to null, or your Dispose will throw an exception. If the field is protected, you can check for nullity before calling Dispose on it so you know you're playing safe.

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You can share such a resource during the lifetime of your object, in which case it is recommended that you implement IDisposable.

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No, it is not. You don't know when the finalized will un. Also, if your resource is managed, it will be disposed of at some point without the finalized.

If you don't want to use using all the time, perhaps ou can use it once around many functions.

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You don't need to override the finalizer in your object, which you have shown in your second code sample by ~MyClass().

You will need to implement the IDisposable pattern. You haven't been explicit in your question if you are using managed and unmanaged resources, but here's a quick sample for a managed resource. Stackoverflow has a myriad of examples on this. Reed Copsey also has a good series on it, and you can start here.

class MyClass : IDisposable
{
   private bool _Disposed;
   private SomeHelper _Helper;
   protected virtual void Dispose()
   {
      this.Dispose(true);
   }
   public void Dispose(bool disposing)
   {
     if (_!Disposed && disposing)
     {
       if (_Helper != null)
          _Helper.Dispose();
       _Disposed = true;
     }
   }
}
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The convention is that if your class owns an IDisposable object it should also implement IDisposable. So rather than implementing a finalizer your class should implement IDisposable and dipose of the helper there.

One problem with implementing the finalizer is that you have no control over when it's being called. The disposable pattern gives you a more deterministic way of cleaning up resources.

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