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I am using a Remote validation attribute on my view model to validate a Bank Account that is specified for my Company:

ViewModel:

[Remote("CheckDefaultBank", "Company")]
    public string DefaultBank
    {

This in the controller I have:

    [HttpGet]
    public JsonResult CheckDefaultBank(string defaultBank)
    {
        bool result = BankExists(defaultBank);
        return Json(result, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }

That all works well. But, I have two other banks related to my company as well. However, when the remote validation js calls the action it uses a parameter mactching the field name of "DefaultBank"... so I use that as a parameter in my action.

Is there some attribute I can add in the view so that it will use a parameter of say "bankId" on the ajax get so I don't need an action for each field which are basically exactly the same?

The goal here is to eliminate now having to have this in my controller:

[HttpGet]
    public JsonResult CheckRefundBank(string refundBank)
    {
        bool result = BankExists(defaultBank);
        return Json(result, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }

[HttpGet]
    public JsonResult CheckPayrollBank(string payrollBank)
    {
        bool result = BankExists(defaultBank);
        return Json(result, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }

I was hoping I could do something like this in the view:

@Html.EditorFor(model => model.DefaultBank, new { data-validate-parameter: bankId })

This way I could just use the same action for all of the Bank entries like:

[HttpGet]
    public JsonResult CheckValidBank(string bankId)
    {
        bool result = BankExists(bankId);
        return Json(result, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }

Possible?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since MVC uses the default model binder for this, just like a normal action method. You could take a FormsCollection as your parameter and lookup the value. However, I personally would find it much easier to just use several parameters to the function, unless you start having dozens of different parameters.

You could also write a custom model binder, that would translate the passed parameter to a generic one.

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Nice simple idea. I included multiple parameters and just used a the null-coalescing operator to get the value of the one that wasn't null. –  PilotBob Nov 22 '11 at 18:54

For just such a situation, I wrote a RemoteReusableAttribute, which may be helpful to you. Here is a link to it: Custom remote Validation in MVC 3

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Very nice! Have you considered extending it to include the case where multiple fields are passed (through the AdditionalFields parameter) which all need generic names? –  Ann L. Dec 13 '11 at 17:28

Consider encapsulating the logic, "BankExists" in this case into a ValidationAttribute (Data Annotations Validator). This allows other scenarios as well.

Then use a wrapper ActionResult like the one below, which lets you pass in any validator.

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult CheckRefundBank(string refundBank)
{
    var validation = BankExistsAttribute();
    return new RemoteValidationResult(validation, defaultBank);
}

Here is the code for the ActionResult that works generically with Validators.

    using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
    using System.Web.Mvc;

    public class RemoteValidationResult : ActionResult
    {
        public RemoteValidationResult(ValidationAttribute validation, object value)
        {
            this.Validation = validation;
            this.Value = value;
        }

        public ValidationAttribute Validation { get; set; }

        public object Value { get; set; }

        public override void ExecuteResult(ControllerContext context)
        {
            var json = new JsonResult();
            json.JsonRequestBehavior = JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet;

            if (Validation.IsValid(Value))
            {
                json.Data = true;
            }
            else
            {
                json.Data = Validation.FormatErrorMessage(Value.ToString());
            }

            json.ExecuteResult(context);
        }
    }

As an extra enhancement consider creating a Controller Extension method to dry up your return call even more.

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