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Let us say I have the following:

var foo = (function(){
    var bar = 0;
    return {
       getBar: function(){
           return bar;
       },
       addOne: function(){
           bar++;
       },
       addRandom: function(rand){
           bar += rand;
       }
    }
})();

And I have the following:

var foo2 = function(){
    var bar = 0;
    this.getBar = function(){
           return bar;
       };
    this.addOne = function(){
           bar++;
       };
    this.addRandom = function(rand){
           bar += rand;
       }
};

Is the only difference in executing the functions a new?

alert(foo.getBar()); //0
foo.addOne();
foo.addRandom(32);
alert(foo.getBar()); //33

var foo2_obj = new foo2;
alert(foo2_obj.getBar());//0
foo2_obj.addOne();
foo2_obj.addRandom(32);
alert(foo2_obj.getBar());//33

They both out put the exact same thing.

So what is the difference in the long run?

What can one do that the other cannot?

Fiddle Demo of the above: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/YtBpe/

share|improve this question
1  
In a sentence: First is an object, second is a function. –  Zirak Nov 22 '11 at 18:32
4  
It's incorrect to concentrate on what can and cannot be accomplished from a purely programmatic perspective. JavaScript's language design, like all code is imperfect. Especially considering the original design's rushed timeline. So, concentrate on best practices. new is typically used in the constructor invocation pattern (viewed as a bad thing by Crockford). It sets this = the prototype object. It also modifies the return value of a method in interesting ways. Thus, constructors should be capitalized to denote their intended use. –  P.Brian.Mackey Nov 22 '11 at 18:55
    
Your examples are irrelevant, because they exist without a larger context. If you want to talk about closure you have to talk about crossing scope boundary and the results of that in a context. –  austincheney Dec 7 '11 at 12:25
    
'foo' will run once and result in an object. 'foo2' can be run with 'new' to create as many objects as you want. Like Brian said, capitalize 'Foo2'. –  Billbad Jan 20 '12 at 16:31

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+100

In the first one you can only create the object once, while with the second one you can create as many objects as you like. I.E. the first one is effectively a singleton.

Note that closures are not ok for the second one. Every time you instantiate it you are creating the functions all over again and waste a ton of memory. The prototype object is intended to counter this, where you can create the functions once outside a function scope and no accidental closures are created.

function foo2(){
    this._bar = 0;
}

foo2.prototype = {

    constructor: foo2,

    getBar: function(){
        return this._bar;
    },

    addOne: function(){
        this._bar++;
    },

    addRandom:function(rand){
        this._bar += rand;
    }

};

Then:

var a = new foo2, b = new foo2, c = new foo2;

Creates three instances which have their own _bar but share the same functionality.

jsperf

You can "compare" all of this to PHP, some of the code won't even run but it's "equivalent" in principle:


var foo = (function(){
    var bar = 0;
    return {
       getBar: function(){
           return bar;
       },
       addOne: function(){
           bar++;
       },
       addRandom: function(rand){
           bar += rand;
       }
    }
})();

is roughly "equivalent" to this in PHP:

$foo = new stdClass;

$foo->bar = 0;

$foo->getBar = function(){
    return $this->bar;
};

$foo->addOne = function(){
    $this->bar++;
}

$foo->addRandom = function($rand){
    $this->bar += $rand;
}

var foo2 = function(){
    var bar = 0;
    this.getBar = function(){
        return bar;
    };
    this.addOne = function(){
        bar++;
    };
    this.addRandom = function(rand){
        bar += rand;
    }
};

Is roughly "equivalent" to this in PHP:

Class foo2 {


    public function __construct(){
    $bar = 0;

        $this->getBar = function(){
            return $bar;
        };
        $this->addOne = function(){
            $bar++;
        };
        $this->addRandom = function($rand){
            $bar += rand;
        };


    }

}

function foo2(){
    this._bar = 0;
}

foo2.prototype = {

    constructor: foo2,

    getBar: function(){
        return this._bar;
    },

    addOne: function(){
        this._bar++;
    },

    addRandom:function(rand){
        this._bar += rand;
    }

};

Is roughly "equivalent" to this in PHP:

Class foo2 {

    public $_bar;

    public function __construct(){
        $this->_bar = 0;    
    }

    public function getBar(){
        return $this->_bar;    
    }

    public function addOne(){
        $this->_bar++
    }

    public function addRandom($rand){
        $this->_bar += $rand;
    }

}

...and is the only one that is close to OOP in the three above examples


share|improve this answer
    
There is no singleton. In OP's post, foo is a function that returns a dynamic object with three functions (getBar, addOne, addRandom). You can make as many instances of that object as you want, it's not a singleton. –  Halcyon Dec 11 '11 at 2:42
1  
@FritsvanCampen, take a closer look in the OP, the function is executed immediately so foo is just an object created once, not a function that creates "dynamic" objects. You can even run it in your console as is... –  Esailija Dec 11 '11 at 12:07
    
+1 for mentioning the shared nature of the private vars, which makes bar in example one a static variable, whereas in the second example it's a private var unique to the object instance –  wheresrhys Dec 13 '11 at 10:15

The only difference is that foo will be a generic Object, whereas foo2_obj will identify as a foo2 when checking its type (i.e. foo2_obj.constructor == foo2 will be true, while the equivalent on foo is foo.constructor == Object).

Of course, there's an important distinction between foo and foo2 - foo is an object, while foo2 is a function (intended for use as a constructor). Thus, it is trivial to make as many instances of foo2 (of which foo2_obj is one), while the idea of creating "instances" of foo doesn't really make sense - the best you could do are copies (which is more difficult than calling a constructor).

Due to the copying/creating instances distinction, the second approach allows for real OO programming with prototype chains, while the first makes such things much more difficult (and ill-advised).

share|improve this answer
    
That's not true. Object.create allows you to make "real" OO with...everything. –  Zirak Nov 22 '11 at 18:31
    
@Zirak The first approach doesn't use Object.create. I don't see how this contradicts what I said. –  Aaron Dufour Nov 22 '11 at 18:33
    
You can also create great inheritance patterns and "power constructors" using the first form. –  jAndy Nov 22 '11 at 18:34
    
@jAndy whats a power constructor? –  Neal Nov 22 '11 at 18:36
    
@Zirak, Are you just saying that as a general thing? Object.create doesn't do anything useful with the first form, nor with the second form either. The second form is not OOP either, all functions are created on every instantiation manually, not inherited from the prototype. It also cannot be extended. :( –  Esailija Dec 11 '11 at 12:22

[1]first,but not important:efficiency

function Foo1() {
    var bar = 0;
    return {
        getBar: function () {
            return bar;
        }
    }
}
var o = Foo1();
o.getBar();


function Foo2() {
    var bar = 0;
    this.getBar = function () {
        return bar;
    }
}
var o = new Foo2();
o.getBar();

which is the faster?,look object-literal-vs-new-operate

[2]program pattern:the former has no program pattern,but the latter will benefit form prototypal inheritance.if now we want to add a method named "logBar",

former:

1:extend every Foo1 instance:

o.logBar = function () {
    console.log(this.getBar());
}
o.logBar();

bad way!

2:find where Foo1 defined and add:

function Foo1() {
    var bar = 0;
    return {
        getBar: function () {
            return bar;
        },
        logBar:function () {
            console.log(this.getBar());
        }
    }
}
var o = Foo1();
o.logBar = o.logBar();

would you want to go back to do this when you want to add more method ervey time?

latter:

Foo2.prototype.logBar = function () {
    console.log(this.getBar());
}

var o = Foo2();
o.logBar = o.logBar();

this would be work fine.

[3] back to efficiency: in Foo1's way,it product logBar function instance ervey time when a Foo1 instance created.object-literal-vs-new-operate

share|improve this answer
    
The ability to use (prototypical) inheritance I think is the most deciding factor. +1 –  Halcyon Dec 9 '11 at 2:44
    
that's it!prototype is important feature in JS. –  island205 Dec 9 '11 at 3:34
1  
There is no prototypical inheritance in the OP and by defining shareable functions in the constructor you are spitting prototypical (or any kind of) inheritance in the face. –  Esailija Dec 11 '11 at 12:12
    
The test object-literal-vs-new-operate tests object creation using a prototype which is not what yours or the questioners example does. Setting this.property within a constructor is not the same as setting foo.prototype.property outside the constructor and does not have the same efficiency savings. –  wheresrhys Dec 13 '11 at 10:13
    
i am very sorry of that.i had a clear version without prototype at jsperf,but it did not save the old version when i change it to show that prototype is better. –  island205 Dec 14 '11 at 1:57

I think in my personal view of this two types
1- Singleton
2- Object

Let's we say we have one page having their javascript using Object (Second), and having many utils using singletons (First), and works fine.

But one day we need a new page that call the first page via AJAX, this new page have their javascript using Object (Second) and have the same utils using singleton, but we add some new functions in the utils singletons.

Turns out, the utils singletons in the new page are overriden for the loaded utils singletons in the first page, So when the new page execute some of those new function doesn't exist, generating errors ...

I think this is my point, the singletons are overriden when you have this scenario, and find erros in cases like this are hard.. hard..., diferent from a object that have unique instances

Cheers.

share|improve this answer

The main difference is actually that foo is an object, whereas foo2 is a function.

That means that you'll not be able to create another object like foo that is not actually foo itself, except if you copy/paste its code.

On the other hand, you can create another foo2 object and manipulate it while using foo2_obj for another purpose.

To make short, foo is an instance while foo2 can bee seen as a class (even if it's just a function constructing an object).

It depends on what you want to do in your program, but I'd surely recommend to use the 2nd form which is allowing to reuse your code by creating other instances.

share|improve this answer
    
Inheriting from an object rather than from a class (by using, for instance, Douglas Crockford's object() method javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html) is actually quite standard practice in javascript –  wheresrhys Dec 13 '11 at 10:03
    
I did not mentioned inheritance but creating another object as the one we defined at first. With the method you're pointing out, the second object will either be empty, or have the same state as the first one, at the time of the duplication (which can have changed since its initialization). –  ghusse Dec 14 '11 at 14:53

foo and foo2_obj They are the same. In both cases you have a function that creates a new object, references a variable in closure scope and returns that object.

You have 4 things

  • anonymous function that is a factory for "foos"
  • object foo created from anonymous factory
  • foo2 which is a name factory for "foo2_objs"
  • object foo2_obj created from foo2 factory

The exact difference between using new and returning function literals from a function is neglible if you don't touch <Function>.prototype

You probably want to compare

var foo2 = function(){
    var bar = 0;
    this.getBar = function(){
           return bar;
       };
    this.addOne = function(){
           bar++;
       };
    this.addRandom = function(rand){
           bar += rand;
       };
};

To

var Foo = {
  addOne: function () { this.bar++; },
  addRandom: function (x) { this.bar+=x; }
};

var foo3 = function () {
  return Object.create(Foo, { bar: { value: 0 } });
}

foo3 uses prototypical OO. this means you don't have to recreate those functions all the time.

share|improve this answer
    
Then what is the point in making object with new? Cant i just self instantiate everything then? –  Neal Nov 22 '11 at 18:27
    
@Neal: of course you can. Lots of good and talented js programmers don't even use new. It might be even a better idea to invoke Object.create() and Object.defineProperties(). And by the way, you better hope Crockford never sees that snippet. Not capitalizing a constructor that is invoked with new is like, asking for a slow dead :p –  jAndy Nov 22 '11 at 18:28
    
@Neal new is a mechanism for prototypical OO. It's part of the ES3 mess that is constructors –  Raynos Nov 22 '11 at 18:32

In simple terms if you are creating 10 instances of foo and foo2, the getBar function of foo will exists 10 times in memory and that of foo2 will be only once.

Also, modern browsers like chrome with V8 compiler, it compiles the js to machine code... in that case foo2 will get translated to a native class object and its like a 20 times faster (when you create say 1000 instances in a loop)


I normally uses the simple object method when there is only once instance of that class/module is needed. The structure that I follow is,

var myInstance = function(){
   var self = {};
   self.bar = null;
   self.gerBar = function(){
      return self.bar
   }
   return self;
}();

this is quite similar to the foo approach, but I find this structure more handy.


One other difference (in practical use) that i normally encounter is when I have callback functions or timeouts inside the class,

var foo2 = function(){
    this.doSomething = function(){
        var temp = this;
        $.someAsyncCall(function(){
           // 'this' in current scope is the inline function itself, not the class instance
           // so have to store the instance ref in a local var in outer scope and then use that to get the class instance
           temp.callAfterAsyncCall();
        });
    };
    this.callAfterAsyncCall = function(){
    };
};

as you can see the local temp variable is not pretty when you have a lot these cases.

where in the other approach, you always the the self reference everywhere inside the module scope,

var myInstance = function(){
   var self = {};
   self.doSomething = function(){
      $.someAsyncCall(function(){
          self.callAfterAsyncCall();
      });
   }
   self.callAfterAsyncCall = function(){
   };
   return self;
}();

I not sure if its important for you, but just thought worth mentioning.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, I'm pretty sure it's not true that "if you are creating 10 instances of foo and foo2, the getBar function of foo will exists 10 times in memory and that of foo2 will be only once." This would definitely be true if you used foo2.prototype.doSomething, but I don't think setting the properties directly on a new instance of foo2 has any efficiency savings of this nature (consider, foo2 could branch and set different properties on different instances depending on a conditional, so it can't make assumptions about all objects sharing the same methods & properties) –  wheresrhys Dec 13 '11 at 10:10

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