Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following table:

CREATE TABLE `prize` (
  `id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `prize_details_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
  `status` tinyint(4) DEFAULT '0',
  `available_at` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `prize_details_id_idx` (`prize_details_id`),
  KEY `status_idx` (`status`),
  KEY `available_at_idx` (`available_at`),
  CONSTRAINT `prize_prize_details_id_prize_detail_id` FOREIGN KEY (`prize_details_id`) REFERENCES `prize_detail` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=1611419 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

What I'd like to do is delete n records, where n is the total number of records that match a condition less 20. The table is reasonably big (greater than 1m records).

The condition is a complex one that involves a relative date query on frequently changing data, and involves a join on a couple of other tables too, so first selecting how many there are that match the condition and then deleting twenty fewer isn't going to work as far as I know.

The condition is all of the following:

  • prize_details_id is x (need to run the same query for a few different IDs)
  • available_at is null
  • prize_id doesn't exist in another table
  • status is 1
  • tier (on the prize_detail table) is above y
share|improve this question
    
So, ultimately, are the last records to keep the 20 latest (that match all the other criteria) according to some date? The highest? What makes these last few special? –  MPelletier Nov 22 '11 at 18:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe like this:

  • create a temporary table _tmp (id int auto_increment, prize_id int)
  • select matching prize ids into this temporary table
  • delete from prize where id in (select prize_id from _tmp where id >=20)
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea, I always forget about temp tables. Will try and update –  BenLanc Nov 22 '11 at 18:37
    
This and @newtover's answer below did the job for me. It was VERY slow (~15 minutes), but did the job eventually. –  BenLanc Nov 23 '11 at 12:05

A possible hint:

mysql>
mysql> CREATE TABLE test (
    ->   id SMALLINT unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
    -> ) ENGINE=InnoDB;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO test () VALUES
    ->   (),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),
    ->   (),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),
    ->   (),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),(),();
Query OK, 30 rows affected (0.01 sec)
Records: 30  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> DELETE FROM t USING
    -> test t JOIN (
    ->     SELECT id
    ->     FROM (
    ->         SELECT id
    ->         FROM test
    ->         ORDER BY id DESC
    ->         LIMIT 20, 1000
    ->     ) as ids) as ids ON t.id = ids.id;
Query OK, 10 rows affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> SELECT * FROM test;
+----+
| id |
+----+
| 11 |
| 12 |
| 13 |
| 14 |
| 15 |
| 16 |
| 17 |
| 18 |
| 19 |
| 20 |
| 21 |
| 22 |
| 23 |
| 24 |
| 25 |
| 26 |
| 27 |
| 28 |
| 29 |
| 30 |
+----+
20 rows in set (0.00 sec)
share|improve this answer
DELETE FROM prize
WHERE 
   id IN(--Some query--) AND
   id NOT IN(SELECT id FROM --Some query-- ORDER BY --some column-- LIMIT 20 )

Where the order by identifies the "last" 20 rows

share|improve this answer
1  
I think he wants to delete all but the last 20...doesn't your query delete the first 20? –  Johnie Karr Nov 22 '11 at 18:37
    
MySQL doesn't support TOP. –  BenLanc Nov 22 '11 at 18:44
    
@MrJamin ok, didn't know it was that awkward –  Magnus Nov 22 '11 at 18:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.