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In the uncompressed situation I know I need to read the wav header, pull out the number of channels, bits, and sample rate and work it out from there: (channels) * (bits) * (samples/s) * (seconds) = (filesize)

Is there a simpler way - a free library, or something in the .net framework perhaps?

How would I do this if the .wav file is compressed (with the mpeg codec for example)?

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By length, do you mean time of the audio or file size? –  Thomas Owens Sep 17 '08 at 11:59
2  
this long: |-----------------| –  nickf Sep 17 '08 at 12:17

14 Answers 14

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You may consider using the mciSendString(...) function (error checking is omitted for clarity):

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace Sound
{
    public static class SoundInfo
    {
        [DllImport("winmm.dll")]
        private static extern uint mciSendString(
            string command,
            StringBuilder returnValue,
            int returnLength,
            IntPtr winHandle);

        public static int GetSoundLength(string fileName)
        {
            StringBuilder lengthBuf = new StringBuilder(32);

            mciSendString(string.Format("open \"{0}\" type waveaudio alias wave", fileName), null, 0, IntPtr.Zero);
            mciSendString("status wave length", lengthBuf, lengthBuf.Capacity, IntPtr.Zero);
            mciSendString("close wave", null, 0, IntPtr.Zero);

            int length = 0;
            int.TryParse(lengthBuf.ToString(), out length);

            return length;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tested this and it worked with compressed a wav too - thanks +1 –  John Sibly Sep 17 '08 at 12:53
    
In fact I think this is the most robust solution. One of the other suggestions I tried loading a MediaPlayer object, seems to take about a second and adds a dependency on .NET 3.5 –  John Sibly Sep 17 '08 at 13:22

Download NAudio.dll from the link http://naudio.codeplex.com/

and then use this function

public static TimeSpan GetWavFileDuration(string fileName)       
{     
    WaveFileReader wf = new WaveFileReader(fileName);
    return wf.TotalTime; 
}

you will get the Duration

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1  
I've found that NAudio's reported TotalTime is typically longer than the sample actually is. Even when the format is uncompressed (i.e. WAV) –  MutantNinjaCodeMonkey Oct 31 '12 at 19:02

Not to take anything away from the answer already accepted, but I was able to get the duration of an audio file (several different formats, including AC3, which is what I needed at the time) using the Microsoft.DirectX.AudioVideoPlayBack namespace. This is part of DirectX 9.0 for Managed Code. Adding a reference to that made my code as simple as this...

Public Shared Function GetDuration(ByVal Path As String) As Integer
    If File.Exists(Path) Then
        Return CInt(New Audio(Path, False).Duration)
    Else
        Throw New FileNotFoundException("Audio File Not Found: " & Path)
    End If
End Function

And it's pretty fast, too! Here's a reference for the Audio class.

share|improve this answer

In the .net framework there is a mediaplayer class:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.media.mediaplayer_members.aspx

Following on from Cetra's suggestion, I wrote a test program - you'll need to add references to PresentationCore and WindowsBase. C:\test.wav is compressed using the mp3 codec.

Hopefully this will be helpful for someone else too:

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MediaPlayer player = new MediaPlayer();
            Uri path = new Uri(@"C:\test.wav");
            player.Open(path);
            Duration duration = player.NaturalDuration;
            if (duration.HasTimeSpan)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(player.NaturalDuration.TimeSpan.ToString());
            }
            player.Close();
        }
    }
}
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Try code below from How to determine the length of a .wav file in C#

    string path = @"c:\test.wav";
    WaveReader wr = new WaveReader(File.OpenRead(path));
    int durationInMS = wr.GetDurationInMS();
    wr.Close();
share|improve this answer

You might find that the XNA library has some support for working with WAV's etc. if you are willing to go down that route. It is designed to work with C# for game programming, so might just take care of what you need.

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There's a bit of a tutorial (with - presumably - working code you can leverage) over at CodeProject.

The only thing you have to be a little careful of is that it's perfectly "normal" for a WAV file to be composed of multiple chunks - so you have to scoot over the entire file to ensure that all chunks are accounted for.

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What exactly is your application doing with compressed WAVs? Compressed WAV files are always tricky - I always try and use an alternative container format in this case such as OGG or WMA files. The XNA libraries tend to be designed to work with specific formats - although it is possible that within XACT you'll find a more generic wav playback method. A possible alternative is to look into the SDL C# port, although I've only ever used it to play uncompressed WAVs - once opened you can query the number of samples to determine the length.

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I'm gonna have to say MediaInfo, I have been using it for over a year with a audio/video encoding application I'm working on. It gives all the information for wav files along with almost every other format.

MediaInfoDll Comes with sample C# code on how to get it working.

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I had difficulties with the example of the MediaPlayer-class above. It could take some time, before the player has opened the file. In the "real world" you have to register for the MediaOpened-event, after that has fired, the NaturalDuration is valid. In a console-app you just have to wait a few seconds after the open.

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      if (args.Length == 0)
        return;
      Console.Write(args[0] + ": ");
      MediaPlayer player = new MediaPlayer();
      Uri path = new Uri(args[0]);
      player.Open(path);
      TimeSpan maxWaitTime = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10);
      DateTime end = DateTime.Now + maxWaitTime;
      while (DateTime.Now < end)
      {
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);
        Duration duration = player.NaturalDuration;
        if (duration.HasTimeSpan)
        {
          Console.WriteLine(duration.TimeSpan.ToString());
          break;
        }
      }
      player.Close();
    }
  }
}
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I'm going to assume that you're somewhat familiar with the structure of a .WAV file : it contains a WAVEFORMATEX header struct, followed by a number of other structs (or "chunks") containing various kinds of information. See Wikipedia for more info on the file format.

First, iterate through the .wav file and add up the the unpadded lengths of the "data" chunks (the "data" chunk contains the audio data for the file; usually there is only one of these, but it's possible that there could be more than one). You now have the total size, in bytes, of the audio data.

Next, get the "average bytes per second" member of the WAVEFORMATEX header struct of the file.

Finally, divide the total size of the audio data by the average bytes per second - this will give you the duration of the file, in seconds.

This works reasonably well for uncompressed and compressed files.

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Imports System.IO
Imports System.Text

Imports System.Math
Imports System.BitConverter

Public Class PulseCodeModulation
    ' Pulse Code Modulation WAV (RIFF) file layout

    ' Header chunk

    ' Type   Byte Offset  Description
    ' Dword       0       Always ASCII "RIFF"
    ' Dword       4       Number of bytes in the file after this value (= File Size - 8)
    ' Dword       8       Always ASCII "WAVE"

    ' Format Chunk

    ' Type   Byte Offset  Description
    ' Dword       12      Always ASCII "fmt "
    ' Dword       16      Number of bytes in this chunk after this value
    ' Word        20      Data format PCM = 1 (i.e. Linear quantization)
    ' Word        22      Channels Mono = 1, Stereo = 2
    ' Dword       24      Sample Rate per second e.g. 8000, 44100
    ' Dword       28      Byte Rate per second (= Sample Rate * Channels * (Bits Per Sample / 8))
    ' Word        32      Block Align (= Channels * (Bits Per Sample / 8))
    ' Word        34      Bits Per Sample e.g. 8, 16

    ' Data Chunk

    ' Type   Byte Offset  Description
    ' Dword       36      Always ASCII "data"
    ' Dword       40      The number of bytes of sound data (Samples * Channels * (Bits Per Sample / 8))
    ' Buffer      44      The sound data

    Dim HeaderData(43) As Byte

    Private AudioFileReference As String

    Public Sub New(ByVal AudioFileReference As String)
        Try
            Me.HeaderData = Read(AudioFileReference, 0, Me.HeaderData.Length)
        Catch Exception As Exception
            Throw
        End Try

        'Validate file format

        Dim Encoder As New UTF8Encoding()

        If "RIFF" <> Encoder.GetString(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 0, 4)) Or _
            "WAVE" <> Encoder.GetString(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 8, 4)) Or _
            "fmt " <> Encoder.GetString(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 12, 4)) Or _
            "data" <> Encoder.GetString(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 36, 4)) Or _
            16 <> ToUInt32(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 16, 4), 0) Or _
            1 <> ToUInt16(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 20, 2), 0) _
        Then
            Throw New InvalidDataException("Invalid PCM WAV file")
        End If

        Me.AudioFileReference = AudioFileReference
    End Sub

    ReadOnly Property Channels() As Integer
        Get
            Return ToUInt16(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 22, 2), 0) 'mono = 1, stereo = 2
        End Get
    End Property

    ReadOnly Property SampleRate() As Integer
        Get
            Return ToUInt32(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 24, 4), 0) 'per second
        End Get
    End Property

    ReadOnly Property ByteRate() As Integer
        Get
            Return ToUInt32(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 28, 4), 0) 'sample rate * channels * (bits per channel / 8)
        End Get
    End Property

    ReadOnly Property BlockAlign() As Integer
        Get
            Return ToUInt16(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 32, 2), 0) 'channels * (bits per sample / 8)
        End Get
    End Property

    ReadOnly Property BitsPerSample() As Integer
        Get
            Return ToUInt16(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 34, 2), 0)
        End Get
    End Property

    ReadOnly Property Duration() As Integer
        Get
            Dim Size As Double = ToUInt32(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 40, 4), 0)
            Dim ByteRate As Double = ToUInt32(BlockCopy(Me.HeaderData, 28, 4), 0)
            Return Ceiling(Size / ByteRate)
        End Get
    End Property

    Public Sub Play()
        Try
            My.Computer.Audio.Play(Me.AudioFileReference, AudioPlayMode.Background)
        Catch Exception As Exception
            Throw
        End Try
    End Sub

    Public Sub Play(playMode As AudioPlayMode)
        Try
            My.Computer.Audio.Play(Me.AudioFileReference, playMode)
        Catch Exception As Exception
            Throw
        End Try
    End Sub

    Private Function Read(AudioFileReference As String, ByVal Offset As Long, ByVal Bytes As Long) As Byte()
        Dim inputFile As System.IO.FileStream

        Try
            inputFile = IO.File.Open(AudioFileReference, IO.FileMode.Open)
        Catch Exception As FileNotFoundException
            Throw New FileNotFoundException("PCM WAV file not found")
        Catch Exception As Exception
            Throw
        End Try

        Dim BytesRead As Long
        Dim Buffer(Bytes - 1) As Byte

        Try
            BytesRead = inputFile.Read(Buffer, Offset, Bytes)
        Catch Exception As Exception
            Throw
        Finally
            Try
                inputFile.Close()
            Catch Exception As Exception
                'Eat the second exception so as to not mask the previous exception
            End Try
        End Try

        If BytesRead < Bytes Then
            Throw New InvalidDataException("PCM WAV file read failed")
        End If

        Return Buffer
    End Function

    Private Function BlockCopy(ByRef Source As Byte(), ByVal Offset As Long, ByVal Bytes As Long) As Byte()
        Dim Destination(Bytes - 1) As Byte

        Try
            Buffer.BlockCopy(Source, Offset, Destination, 0, Bytes)
        Catch Exception As Exception
            Throw
        End Try

        Return Destination
    End Function
End Class
share|improve this answer
2  
Um, the question asked for C# code, not VB.NET. –  Luke Woodward Sep 22 '12 at 16:12

Download "PresentationCore.dll" and "WindowsBase.dll" from:

http://www.search-dll.com/dll-files/download/windowsbase.dll.html

Paste the files in you application bin folder for reference. It should work now.

share|improve this answer
2  
-1, this is utterly the wrong thing to do. PresentationCore & WindowsBase are part of the framework and should not be downloaded from anywhere on t'internet. –  Rob Aug 17 '10 at 12:24

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