Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Assume I have a Class Foo which has many internal variables, only one constructor and non modifying methods. The calculation of the values for the internal variables involves state variables and complex functions and thus should not be part of Foo. Thus I created a class FooCreator that performs the calculus and in the end creates Foo.

First I implemented all member variables necessary for the creation of Foo separately in FooCreator and added a createFoo() function, but in the end FooCreator became almost a copy of Foo plus some more state variables.

Next I decided to let FooCreator inherit from Foo which saves a lot of typing but this just does not feel like a clean solution, since to gain sth. I have to make Foo's member variables protected instead of private, thus exposing more than I want for other users. Foo should not be used as base class except for the creation.

I had a look at the factory pattern but that seems overkill as well as the builder. Surely this problem will be very common. So what would be the proper way to deal with this problem?

Some code example would look like this:

class Foo{
    private: //protected for second case
      int mVal;
      State mState;
      ComplexStuff mStuff;
      //...

    public:
      Foo():mVal(),mState(),mStuff(){}
      Foo(int val, State const& state, ComplexStuff const& stuff):
        mVal(val),mState(state),mStuff(stuff){}
      bool loadFromFile();

      bool evalStateTransition(State const& formerState) const{/*....*/}
      bool someTest(int) const{/*....*/};
      GraphicItem* visualize() const{/* ....*/};
      //...  
  };

  class FooCreator{  
    private:
      int mVal;
      State mState;
      ComplexStuff mStuff;

      StuffVisualizer mStuffVis;
      Paramset mParams;    
      //...

    public:
      FooCreator(Paramset const& set):
        mVal(),mState(),mStuff(),mStuffVis(),mParams(set){}
      constructState(int, int, int);
      gatherStuff1(File file1);
      Foo createFoo();

      int evalStateTransition(State const& formerState)  const{
        /*same long code as in Foo*/
      }
      bool someTest(int) const{ /*same long code as in Foo*/}
      GraphicItem* visualize() const{ /*same long code as in Foo*/}
      //...  
  };

  class FooCreator2 : public Foo{  
    private:
      StuffVisualizer mStuffVis;
      Paramset mParams;    
      //...

    public:
      FooCreator(Paramset const& set):Foo(),mParams(set){}
      constructState(int, int, int);
      gatherStuff1(File file1);
      Foo createFoo();    
  };
share|improve this question
    
You had it right, the factory pattern fits this scenario. –  jli Nov 22 '11 at 18:37
    
@jli: True I want to separate creation from the created object, but I need only one creation process not different creators. Further I need access to many of Foo's functions as well. Should I copy all methods in the creator ? I cannot create Foo to use its methods as long as it is not complete. –  Martin Nov 22 '11 at 18:54
1  
If all Foo objects need to do some complex calculations in order to by considered complete, why shouldn't that stuff be done in the constructor? The factory pattern is useful when you want to initialize a Factory that can spit out any number of objects all with the same initial state. –  Michael Price Nov 22 '11 at 19:05
    
@Michael: Foo is part of a library and only initialized from a file. I use another program to build Foo objects and then write them to the file. Users of Foo are not supposed to build Foo without the file. –  Martin Nov 22 '11 at 19:21
1  
@Martin - I'm not sure I understand what you are saying. Why would Foo being compiled into a library matter? What do you mean by "initialized from a file"? –  Michael Price Nov 22 '11 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

just write friend class FooCreator; in Foo, and now you can access all the private fields of Foo from FooCreator. Then just create a field of type Foo in FooCreator... Nice, and easy.

share|improve this answer
    
But then I have to include FooCreator in Foo and this days a lot of things into a formerly small and well defined library containing Foo –  Martin Nov 22 '11 at 23:14
    
Oops that was wrong I had a namespace issue the friend itself does not need an include, as you say friend would work and could help in my scenario. –  Martin Nov 22 '11 at 23:44

It can be good to keep complex logic out of the constructor. However, if you don't want to use the Factory or Builder pattern, then you can extract a ParameterObject.

If you need to use methods in Foo to create an instance then maybe you should try to split Foo into two classes.

share|improve this answer
3  
“It is good to keep complex logic out of the constructor” – and I’m not at all convinced by that. The constructor should ensure that the object is in a valid, meaningful state. If that involves complex logic, so be it (see file streams). A constructor doesn’t define itself by the amount of logic it handles, only by the effect: leave the object in a well-defined state. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 22 '11 at 19:21
    
This is just a design principle I follow. Certainly it is more important to leave the object in a well-defined state (a good way to do this is to keep your constructor simple). Also, it helps for testability and managing dependencies. –  Garrett Hall Nov 22 '11 at 19:26
1  
@GarrettHall - Why would it be good to keep complex logic out of the constructor? There are times when moving stuff out of the constructor makes great sense, but I don't think that complexity is a good enough reason by itself. After all, that complexity is going to have to go somewhere! –  Michael Price Nov 22 '11 at 19:26
1  
@Garrett I’m not convinced by most of what Uncle Bob writes. With regard to constructors we had a similar thread (C++) coming to the opposite conclusion here. Of course I don’t find it now … I agree that in any case it’s a trade-off but Uncle Bob’s flat-out assertion at the beginning of his answer is just too general, and generally wrong. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 22 '11 at 19:43
1  
@GarrettHall - There's a big difference between business logic and state necessary for an object to be considered complete. In other words, if a class's constructor is calling methods on other objects, it better be to complete the state of this object. That doesn't appear to be the situation here. –  Michael Price Nov 22 '11 at 19:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.