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I've encountered something quite surprising when using generic constraints with inheritance. I have an overloaded methods Foo that differ with parameter - either base or derived class instance. In both cases it's generally just passing the instance to the second pair of overloaded methods - Bar.

When I call Foo with base class instance, Bar overload for the base class is called. When I call Foo with derived class instance, Bar overload for the derived class is called. This is clear and expected.

But when I tried to merge Foo methods into single one GenericFoo that use generics and constraints, methods are resolved differently - T is resolved correctly, but only base-class overload of Bar is called.

public class Animal { }
public class Cat : Animal { }

public class AnimalProcessor
{
    public static void Foo(Animal obj)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foo(Animal)");
        Bar(obj);
    }

    public static void Foo(Cat obj)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foo(Cat)");
        Bar(obj);
    }

    // new generic method to replace the two above
    public static void GenericFoo<T>(T obj)
        where T : Animal
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foo(generic)");
        Bar(obj);
    }

    public static void Bar(Animal obj)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Bar(Animal)");
    }

    public static void Bar(Cat obj)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Bar(Cat)");
    }
}

Testing code - two first cases for non-generic old methods, two last for new generic method.

Console.WriteLine("Animal()");
AnimalProcessor.Foo(new Animal());
Console.WriteLine();

Console.WriteLine("Cat()"); 
AnimalProcessor.Foo(new Cat());
Console.WriteLine();

Console.WriteLine("Animal()");
AnimalProcessor.GenericFoo(new Animal());
Console.WriteLine();

Console.WriteLine("Cat()"); 
AnimalProcessor.GenericFoo(new Cat());
Console.ReadLine();

And the result - note the difference in type resolved in Bar:

Animal()
Foo(Animal)
Bar(Animal)

Cat()
Foo(Cat)
Bar(Cat)

Animal()
Foo(generic)
Bar(Animal)

Cat()
Foo(generic)
Bar(Animal)

It looks like the compiler binds all calls from GenericFoo to the least specific overload, even if all more specific-typed calls are known at compile time. Why is that, what is the reason for such behaviour? Which part of specs defines this?

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Just as a side note, to force a type, you could do AnimalProcessor.GenericFoo<Cat>(new Cat()); although +1 as I'm interested in the answer too. –  George Duckett Nov 22 '11 at 19:20
1  
"…even if all more specific-typed calls are known at compile time." This is a false assumption. The compiler can't know what callers will consume the dll it produces, as they may well come from other assemblies. –  Jay Nov 22 '11 at 19:21
    
Sure, for all not known implementations, Animal is a safe fallback. But in my case Cat is known at compile time and is known to be used as T. Why is this not resolved? –  NOtherDev Nov 22 '11 at 19:24
2  
compiling Foo(Cat, the compiler knows obj is of type Cat. When compiling Foo<T>, obj could be Cat, Dog, or Animal. It doesn't know at compile time, and as it has no control over who executes this method in the assembly, can't make assumptions for what exact type obj will be at runtime. The methods aren't virtual, so it binds to Animal –  hatchet Nov 22 '11 at 19:30
2  
Generics are not templates. Generic methods are compiled once and their behavior is for the 'most generic' case (in this case, Animal.) This is different from C++ style templating, where the template is compiled separately for each specialization by type. –  Dan Bryant Nov 22 '11 at 20:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Per OP's request, comment re-posted as answer:

Generics are not templates. Generic methods are compiled once and their behavior is for the 'most generic' case (in this case, Animal.) This is different from C++ style templating, where the template is compiled separately for each specialization by type.

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The generic C# method is compiled into a generic IL method. And in IL, you have to explicitly specify which overload you are calling. So there is no simple way how the compiler could have done this. (There is complicated way: run a mini-compiler that chooses the overload at this point dynamically, which is what dynamic does.)

If you want this behavior, one option would be to make Bar() a virtual method on Animal. Another option would be using dynamic.

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