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Baffled.

class Test
{
    void Main()
    {
        F(() => "");                // ok
        F(named: () => "");         // 'T' cannot be inferred from the usage!
        F<string>(() => "");        // ok
        F<string>(named: () => ""); // ok
    }

    void F<T>(Func<T> named) { }
}

Could someone tell me why the second call to F fails to compile?

(Note that this is a significantly stripped down example, which is why it seems synthetic. In the real case I came across, there are some default parameters before 'named' and so the named parameter is required. And so, apparently is explicit specification of 'T' by the caller.)

share|improve this question
1  
seems like an inadequacy in the compiler's delegate type inference. – Jeff Nov 22 '11 at 19:21
    
Sounds likely. And if you make that comment into an answer I'll accept it. – scobi Nov 28 '11 at 22:40
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Seems like an inadequacy in the compiler's delegate type inference...sorry I can't offer more.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? No one else cared to answer and the author stated "Sounds likely. And if you make that comment into an answer I'll accept it.". – Jeff Nov 29 '11 at 16:56
    
Well at least I could push it back to 0 with my vote, heh. – scobi Nov 29 '11 at 17:43

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