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Imagine you have:

a = {{5, 1, 1}, {2, 0, 7}, {3, -4, 6}}

and you want to order it by the second column, to get

b = {{3, -4, 6}, {2, 0, 7}, {5, 1, 1}}

I have tried with SortBy[a, Last] and works for the last column, but I can't get it to work for the second column.

Thanks in advance :-)

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2  
Hmmm.... "top 0.23% this year" (Belisarus) vs "top 0.17% this month" (Niels) –  Brett Champion Nov 22 '11 at 20:19
    
@Brett I am not Belisarus, Champon :D –  belisarius Nov 23 '11 at 3:16
1  
@belisarius My apologies! I'll have to add your name to the spell checker on my system. I'm quite quite amused by the edit history on your answer... –  Brett Champion Nov 23 '11 at 3:32
    
@Brett I was not aware of the edit history as I only saw Sjoerd's edit, and considered it an enhancement. Looking at the history is also a vote of confidence :D –  belisarius Nov 23 '11 at 4:14

6 Answers 6

This does work:

SortBy[a,#[[2]]&]
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2  
Thank you for answering in less than a minute!!, you saved my day :-D –  ninescita Nov 22 '11 at 20:13

Alternatively,

a[[Ordering[a[[All, 2]]]]]
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And here, for the obligatory timing (I added the basic Sort to the methods):

a = RandomReal[{0, 10}, {1000000, 3}];

Sort[a, #2[[2]] < #1[[2]] &]; // Timing

(* ==> {34.367, Null} *)

SortBy[a, #[[2]] &]; // Timing

(* ==> {0.436, Null} *)

 a[[Ordering[a[[All, 2]]]]]; // Timing

(* ==> {0.234, Null}, Chris wins *)
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1  
+1, weird. I expected SortBy to win, and I did not expect Sort to fair that badly. –  rcollyer Nov 23 '11 at 3:08
    
+1 We should include a timing addenda on every question. And thank you for editing my answer :) –  belisarius Nov 23 '11 at 4:16
1  
@rcollyer More interesting timings here stackoverflow.com/questions/6659227/… –  belisarius Nov 23 '11 at 4:20
1  
@rcollyer the Sort result is predictable because it introduces an arbitrary ordering function. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 23 '11 at 5:57
2  
From the discussion above, some numerical experiments, it seems that the user-supplied function will be called ~1.35 Log[n] as many times when using Sort than when using SortBy. This gives us a factor of ~19 compared to the actual timing ratio of ~100. Where that 5x difference comes from, I can imagine lots of reasonable explanations, but none that are easily testable. –  Szabolcs Nov 23 '11 at 11:04

Maybe you can use this url: http://12000.org/my_notes/mma_matlab_control/KERNEL/node99.htm

Code you can use:

a={{300,48,2},{500,23,5},{120,55,7},{40,32,1}};
b=SortBy[a, #[[2]]&]

Result:

Out[9]= {{500,23,5},{40,32,1},{300,48,2},{120,55,7}}
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1  
Thank you for the link. In fact I wanted to order in descending order and this works: SortBy[a, -#[[2]]&] –  ninescita Nov 22 '11 at 20:20

If your data were:

a = {{5, 1, 1}, {2, 1, 7}, {3, -4, 6}}

And you needed a stable sort on the second element, yielding:

{{3, -4, 6}, {5, 1, 1}, {2, 1, 7}}

It could be very frustrating to try to solve this with SortBy, unless you were aware of this:

SortBy[a, {#[[2]] &}]

The {} brackets are important.

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1  
It took me a couple of hours before I noticed you'd posted this. It then took some time before I saw what your point was, and then it took way too long before I understood your point. Interesting, you should've made that more explicit I guess. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 23 '11 at 10:43
    
@Sjoerd is that any better? –  Mr.Wizard Nov 23 '11 at 10:49
    
A bit. My first problem was that at first I didn't notice you slightly changed the original data from the question (to introduce the issue of 'ties'), and then I didn't understand why the brackets solved the problem. How ties are resolved if there aren't any extra tie-breaking functions between the brackets isn't documented AFAI can tell. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 23 '11 at 11:03
    
I think the tie-breaking rule in the {} case is simply 'first come, first go'. In the no-{} case it is sorting canonically. Try both sorts on a = {{5, 1, 1}, {2, 1, 7}, {3, -4, 6}, {2, 1, 6}} for instance. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 23 '11 at 11:20
    
@Sjoerd Yes, that is my understanding. –  Mr.Wizard Nov 23 '11 at 12:11

just a tip in this context: when using non-atomar objects like Sqrt[...] you might get unexpected results:

SortBy[Range[10], -Sqrt[#] &]
{9, 4, 1, 8, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10}

this is due to

Sort usually orders expressions by putting shorter ones first, and then comparing parts in a depth-first manner. (Mathematica reference manual).

Always use N, when a numeric sort is desired.

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Good tip. If "atomar" is not a typo does it mean something besides atomic? –  Mr.Wizard Nov 23 '11 at 14:24
    
@Mr. "a tomar" means "Let's drink!" in Spanish –  belisarius Nov 24 '11 at 7:50
    
@bel good to know, but probably a typo in that case. :-) –  Mr.Wizard Nov 24 '11 at 8:00

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