Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Isn't there a (simple) way to tell Linq To SQL classes that a particular DateTime property should be considered as UTC (i.e. having the Kind property of the DateTime type to be Utc by default), or is there a 'clean' workaround?

The time zone on my app-server is not the same as the SQL 2005 Server (cannot change any), and none is UTC. When I persist a property of type DateTime to the dB I use the UTC value (so the value in the db column is UTC), but when I read the values back (using Linq To SQL) I get the .Kind property of the DateTime value to be 'Unspecified'.

The problem is that when I 'convert' it to UTC it is 4 hours off. This also means that when it is serialized it it ends up on the client side with a 4 hour wrong offset (since it is serialized using the UTC).

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

The generated LinqToSql code provides extensibility points, so you can set values when the objects are loaded.

The key is to create a partial class which extends the generated class, and then implement the OnLoaded partial method.

For instance, let's say your class is Person, so you have a generated partial Person class in Blah.designer.cs.

Extend the partial class by creating a new class (must be in a different file), as follows:

public partial class Person {

  partial void OnLoaded() {
    this._BirthDate = DateTime.SpecifyKind(this._BirthDate, DateTimeKind.Utc);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Awesome! this allowed me to make a clean fix! –  vdboor Aug 19 '10 at 16:38
1  
Unfortunately stored procedure L2S result classes don't appear to offer this extensibility :( Guess I'll rescope the SP function to private and create a public overload which specifies the Kind. –  Stephen Kennedy May 2 '13 at 19:21

SQL Server DateTime does not include any timezone or DateTimeKind information, therefore DateTime values retrieved from the database correctly have Kind = DateTimeKind.Unspecified.

If you want to make these times UTC, you should 'convert' them as follows:

DateTime utcDateTime = new DateTime(databaseDateTime.Ticks, DateTimeKind.Utc);

or the equivalent:

DateTime utcDateTime = DateTime.SpecifyKind(databaseDateTime, DateTimeKind.Utc);

I assume your problem is that you are attempting to convert them as follows:

DateTime utcDateTime = databaseDateTime.ToUniversalTime();

This may appear reasonable at first glance, but according to the MSDN documentation for DateTime.ToUniversalTime, when converting a DateTime whose Kind is Unspecified:

The current DateTime object is assumed to be a local time, and the conversion is performed as if Kind were Local.

This behavior is necessary for backwards compatibility with .NET 1.x, which didn't have a DateTime.Kind property.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is a nice workaround, though the answer about partial void OnLoaded allows a nicer fix –  vdboor Aug 19 '10 at 16:35

The only way I can think to do this would be to add a shim property in a partial class that does the translation...

share|improve this answer

@rob263 provided an excellent method.

This is only an additional help I wish to provide if you are using Entity Framework instead of Linq To Sql.

Entity Framework does not support OnLoaded event.

Instead, you can do the following:

 public partial class Person
    {
        protected override void OnPropertyChanged(string property)
        {
            if (property == "BirthDate")
            {
                this._BirthDate= DateTime.SpecifyKind(this._BirthDate, DateTimeKind.Utc);
            }

            base.OnPropertyChanged(property);
        }

    }
share|improve this answer

For our case it was impractical to always specify the DateTimeKind as stated previously:

DateTime utcDateTime = DateTime.SpecifyKind(databaseDateTime, DateTimeKind.Utc);

We are using Entity Framework, but this should be similar to Linq-to-SQL

If you want to force all DateTime objects coming out of the database to be specified as UTC you'll need to add a T4 transform file and add additional logic for all DateTime and nullable DateTime objects such that they get initialized as DateTimeKind.Utc

I have a blog post which explains this step by step: http://www.aaroncoleman.net/post/2011/06/16/Forcing-Entity-Framework-to-mark-DateTime-fields-at-UTC.aspx

In short:

1) Create the .tt file for your .edmx model (or .dbml for Linq-to-SQL)

2) Open the .tt file and find the "WritePrimitiveTypeProperty" method.

3) Replace the existing setter code. This is everything between the ReportPropertyChanging and the ReportPropertyChanged method callbacks with the following:

<#+ if( ((PrimitiveType)primitiveProperty.TypeUsage.EdmType).PrimitiveTypeKind == PrimitiveTypeKind.DateTime)
            {
#>
        if(<#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#> == new DateTime())
        {
            <#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#> = StructuralObject.SetValidValue(value<#=OptionalNullableParameterForSetValidValue(primitiveProperty, code)#>);
<#+ 
            if(ef.IsNullable(primitiveProperty))
            {  
#>              
            if(value != null)
                <#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#> = DateTime.SpecifyKind(<#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#>.Value, DateTimeKind.Utc);
<#+             } 
            else
            {#>
            <#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#> = DateTime.SpecifyKind(<#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#>, DateTimeKind.Utc);                
<#+ 
            } 
#>
        }
        else
        {
            <#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#> = StructuralObject.SetValidValue(value<#=OptionalNullableParameterForSetValidValue(primitiveProperty, code)#>);
        }
<#+ 
        }
        else
        {
#>
    <#=code.FieldName(primitiveProperty)#> = StructuralObject.SetValidValue(value<#=OptionalNullableParameterForSetValidValue(primitiveProperty, code)#>);
<#+ 
        }
#>
share|improve this answer
    
This approach is great, but I'm trying to find the fix for this very same scenario, except when you use projection to create new Objects on a LINQ query. For example, context.Entities.Select(o => new { Date = o.DateField }) –  Mauricio Morales Jul 26 '12 at 2:04
    
@Mauricio, if you're using an .edmx file it should be similar, or the same. The idea is that you're just using the T4 transform to override how the framework initializes DateTimes when projected. –  aarondcoleman Aug 17 '12 at 1:14
    
Thanks! I actually did give it a shot (back then) and for what I remember, I was able to override Entities projection but not primitive types. I may have to go back and check if you still think Primitive Types can be mangled during projection initialization. –  Mauricio Morales Oct 29 '12 at 14:02

Ended up with a solution partially based on Marc's suggestion. For details, see link

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't change the generated code because your changes will be overwritten when the code is regenerated. –  Mark Byers Mar 24 '10 at 9:52
    
The link is dead. –  SandRock Jan 12 '13 at 17:23

This code snippet will allow you to convert the DateTimes (Kind=Unspecified) you get back from LINQ to SQL into UTC times without the times being affected.

TimeZoneInfo UTCTimeZone = TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById("UTC");
DateTime utcTime = TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTimeToUtc(myLinq2SQLTime, UTCTimeZone);

There are probably cleaner ways to do this but I had this to hand and could test it quickly!

I am not sure if there is a way to get it working with LINQ to SQL classes transparently - you might want to look in the partial class and see if you can hook where the values are read/written.

share|improve this answer

I you want UTC, TimeZone class can do it for you, if you want to convert between different timezones, than TimeZoneInfo is for you. exemple from my code with TimeZoneInfo:

TimeZoneInfo cet = TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById("Central European Standard Time");
ac.add_datetime = TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTime(DateTime.Now, cet);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.