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Suppose I have this:

abstract class Command {
  static void run (String[]argv) {}
}
class Slice extends Command {
  static void run (String[]argv) {/* slicing code */}
}
class Dice extends Command {
  static void run (String[]argv) {/* dicing code */}
}

I want to be able to iterate over the commands, so I wrote:

Class<Command>[] commands = {Slice.class,Dice.class}; /* compile error */
for (Class<Command> c : commands) {
  if (some_string.equals(c.getName()) {
    c.getDeclaredMethod("run",String[].class).invoke(argv);
    return;
  }
}

however, it appears that Slice.class and Dice.class cannot be placed into the same container as Class<Command>.

If I replace Class<Command> with Class everywhere, the code compiles with one warning:

 [unchecked] unchecked call to getDeclaredMethod(java.lang.String,java.lang.Class<?>...) as a member of the raw type java.lang.Class
    c.getDeclaredMethod("run",String[].class).invoke(argv);

which can, of course, be suppressed, but, I wonder, is there a more elegant solution?

(Of course, in C, this could have been done with an array of structs with two elements: a string and a pointer to a function).

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Why are you working with Class objects (and a static run method) instead of Class instances and an instance run method? –  Daniel Pryden Nov 22 '11 at 20:24
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5 Answers

Only Command.class is of the type Class<Command>. All of its subtypes are of the type Class<? extends Command>. If you change the array and iterator type to Class<? extends Command>, the rest of the code should work.

Class<? extends Command>[] commands = {Slice.class,Dice.class};
for (Class<? extends Command> c : commands) {
  if (some_string.equals(c.getName()) {
    c.getDeclaredMethod("run",String[].class).invoke(argv);
    return;
  }
}

Unless you need the reflection, it would be simpler to simply have an array of Command objects (which requires the removal of the static keyword on the run method):

Command[] commands = {new Slice(), new Dice()};
for (Command cmd : commands) {
  if (some_string.equals(cmd.getClass().getName())) {
    cmd.run (argv);
    return;
  }
}
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1  
I think for the second one, it's also better to make the run method non-static. Because, looking at the snippet it's hard to tell that it's not an instance method. +1. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 22 '11 at 20:27
    
@BheshGurung Yes, the run methods would make more sense as non-static methods (with Command as an interface as @DmitryBeransky mentions). –  101100 Nov 22 '11 at 20:29
1  
If the methods were static in the second command, would the code even work correctly? I thought static method calls in Java are early-bound depending on the compile-time type of the variable. –  millimoose Nov 22 '11 at 20:43
    
@Inerdial Ah, you are right; I've added that to the answer. –  101100 Nov 22 '11 at 20:50
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I highly recommend you just drop the reflection and make your classes instances (So that the methods are no longer static), everything will be much clearer and more sensible, and you will later find that this design allows for future improvement of your classes--if you keep down this road you are in for a world of hurt (Well, at least a small city of hurt)

I love that Reflection is non-trivial in Java for just this reason, it discourages people a little and makes them rethink their approach.

Note that you are also binding some data directly to a class name (code construct). I'm not saying it's wrong, I've done it many times and it's Extremely Tempting and elegant--but eventually I've always regretted it to some degree or another. Some real-world concern creeps in that doesn't match your class naming conventions/rules...

I would just use a pattern like this instead: Command.wants(some_string), either that or have a string-to-class-instance map which removes your entire loop and the code becomes

myHashMap<Command>.get(some_string).run();
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Of course, the fact there's no way to express this cleanly in Java can also be seen as a deficiency of the language. (I believe Obj-C does, in fact, let you inherit and override static methods, for instance.) That said, in this case using reflection is a suboptimal design. –  millimoose Nov 22 '11 at 20:38
    
+1 Just because you can, doesn't mean you should. –  Dunes Nov 22 '11 at 20:44
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Try declaring your command array as Class<? extends Command>

also, the way things are shown here, Command should be an interface, not an abstract class (unless you plan to add more behavior to it later).

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Your design is a bad way to implement this pattern anyway. In Java, you'll get clearer code if you use instances even when you don't really need instance state:

Commands

interface Command {
    void run(String[] args);
}

class Slice implements Command {
    void run(String[] args) { /* slices */ }
}

class Dice implements Command {
    void run(String[] args) { /* dices */ }
}

Use

Command[] = {new Slice(), new Dice()};
for (Command c : commands) {
    if (someString.equals(c.getClass().getName())) {
        c.run(args);
        return;
    }
}

(I'd also probably store the commands in a HashMap from command name to implementation instead of searching the array.)

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Class<Command>[] commands = {Slice.class,Dice.class}; /* compile error */

You cannot create a generic array in Java.

So, you have to use some class from the Collection framework if you need generic collection.

e.g.

List<Class<? extends Command>> commandList = new ArrayList<Class<? extends Command>>();
commandList.add(Slice.class);
commandList.add(Dice.class);
for(Class<? extends Command> command : commandList) {
    Method runMethod = command.getDeclaredMethod("run", String[].class);
    runMethod.setAccessible(true);
    runMethod.invoke(null, new Object[]{null});    
}
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