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Here's a conundrum for your nerdy pleasure. Sometimes it's handy to mock up something with a little C program that uses a big chunk of static memory. While programming one these such programs, I noticed after changing to Fedora 15 the program took a long time to compile. We're talking 30s vs. 0.1s. Even more weird was that ld (the linker) was maxing out the CPU and slowly started eating all available memory. After some fiddling, the details of which I forget, I managed to find a correlation between this new problem and the size of my swap file. Here's an example program for the purposes of this discussion:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define M 1000000
#define GIANT_SIZE (200*M)

size_t g_arr[GIANT_SIZE];

int main( int argc, char **argv){   
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i<10; i++){
        printf("This should be zero: %d\n",g_arr[i]);
    }
    exit(1);
}

This program has a giant array which has a declared size of about 200*8MB = 1.6GB of static memory. Compiling this program takes an inordinate amount of time:

[me@bleh]$ time gcc HugeTest.c 

real    0m12.954s
user    0m6.995s
sys 0m3.890s

[me@bleh]$

13s For a ~13 line C program!? That's not right. The key number is the size of the static memory space. As soon as it is larger than the total swap space, it starts to compile quickly again. For example, I have 5.3GB of swap space, so changing GIANT_SIZE to (1000*M) gives the following time:

[me@bleh]$ time gcc HugeTest.c 

real    0m0.087s
user    0m0.026s
sys 0m0.027s

Ah, that's more like it! To further convince myself (and yourself, if you're trying this at home) that swap space was indeed the magic number, I tried changing the available swap space to a truly massive 19GB and trying to compile the (1000*M) version again:

[me@bleh]$ ls -ali /extraswap 
5986 -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 14680064000 Jul 26 15:01 /extraswap
[me@bleh]$ sudo swapon /extraswap 
[me@bleh]$ time gcc HugeTest.c 

real    4m28.089s
user    0m0.016s
sys 0m0.010s

It didn't even complete after 4.5 minutes! (Keep in mind, dear readers, I had to sacrifice this entire time to the running of that command, as ld begins to eat up all available memory then starts swapping, effectively freezing up the computer).

Clearly the linker is doing something wrong here, but I don't know how to work around this other than rewriting the program or messing around with swap space. I'd love to know if there's a solution, or if I've stumbled upon some arcane bug.

By the way, the programs all compile and run correctly, independent of all the swap business.

For reference, here is some possibly relevant information:

[]$ ulimit -a

core file size          (blocks, -c) 0
data seg size           (kbytes, -d) unlimited
scheduling priority             (-e) 0
file size               (blocks, -f) unlimited
pending signals                 (-i) 27027
max locked memory       (kbytes, -l) 64
max memory size         (kbytes, -m) unlimited
open files                      (-n) 1024
pipe size            (512 bytes, -p) 8
POSIX message queues     (bytes, -q) 819200
real-time priority              (-r) 0
stack size              (kbytes, -s) 8192
cpu time               (seconds, -t) unlimited
max user processes              (-u) 1024
virtual memory          (kbytes, -v) unlimited
file locks                      (-x) unlimited

[]$ uname -r

2.6.40.6-0.fc15.x86_64

[]$ ld --version

GNU ld version 2.21.51.0.6-6.fc15 20110118
Copyright 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This program is free software; you may redistribute it under the terms of
the GNU General Public License version 3 or (at your option) a later version.
This program has absolutely no warranty.

[]$ gcc --version

gcc (GCC) 4.6.1 20110908 (Red Hat 4.6.1-9)
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

[]$ cat /proc/meminfo 
MemTotal:        3478272 kB
MemFree:         1749388 kB
Buffers:           16680 kB
Cached:           212028 kB
SwapCached:       368056 kB
Active:           489688 kB
Inactive:         942820 kB
Active(anon):     401340 kB
Inactive(anon):   803436 kB
Active(file):      88348 kB
Inactive(file):   139384 kB
Unevictable:          32 kB
Mlocked:              32 kB
SwapTotal:      19906552 kB
SwapFree:       17505120 kB
Dirty:               172 kB
Writeback:             0 kB
AnonPages:        914972 kB
Mapped:            60916 kB
Shmem:              1008 kB
Slab:              55248 kB
SReclaimable:      26720 kB
SUnreclaim:        28528 kB
KernelStack:        3608 kB
PageTables:        63344 kB
NFS_Unstable:          0 kB
Bounce:                0 kB
WritebackTmp:          0 kB
CommitLimit:    21645688 kB
Committed_AS:   11208980 kB
VmallocTotal:   34359738367 kB
VmallocUsed:      139336 kB
VmallocChunk:   34359520516 kB
HardwareCorrupted:     0 kB
AnonHugePages:    151552 kB
HugePages_Total:       0
HugePages_Free:        0
HugePages_Rsvd:        0
HugePages_Surp:        0
Hugepagesize:       2048 kB
DirectMap4k:      730752 kB
DirectMap2M:     2807808 kB

TL;DR: When the (large) static memory of a c program is slightly less than the available swap space, the linker takes forever to link the program. However, it's quite snappy when the static space is slightly larger than the available swap space. What's up with that!?

share|improve this question
    
Duplicates this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4978664/… –  praetorian droid Nov 22 '11 at 21:03
    
@DavidSchwartz Thanks for catching that; corrected. –  Rooke Nov 22 '11 at 21:44
1  
@praetoriandroid Excellent find, I'm sorry I didn't see that earlier. The answer in that question explains nicely why this is probably happening, but I'll point out something further that my question implies - why is it that the linker can be so zippy for something slightly larger than the available swap space? –  Rooke Nov 22 '11 at 21:49
    
@Rooke: It seems likely that when insufficient swap space is available, the allocation of the entire object fails and the linker falls back on a different method that actually runs faster (due to not dipping into swap at all). –  caf Nov 22 '11 at 23:16
    
Some more info that may be useful: I have no swap at all and compilation of the code above with 800 Mb buffer takes about 6.7 seconds on my PC. Running program that just dinamically allocates buffer of the same size and bzero it, takes about .7 seconds - almost 10 times less (9.5 actually). When take buffer size twice less then both times became twice less (3.4s vs .36s), but ratio is the same - about 9.5 times. –  praetorian droid Nov 23 '11 at 6:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted
+50

I am able to reproduce this on an Ubuntu 10.10 system (GNU ld (GNU Binutils for Ubuntu) 2.20.51-system.20100908), and I think I have your answer. First, some methodology.

After confirming this happens to me in a small VM (512MB ram, 2GB swap), from here I decided the easiest thing to do would be to strace gcc and see what exactly was going on when everything went to hell:

~# strace -f gcc swap.c

It illuminated the following:

vfork()                                 = 3589
[pid  3589] execve("/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.4.5/collect2", ["/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4."..., "--build-id", "--eh-frame-hdr", "-m", "elf_x86_64", "--hash-style=gnu", "-dynamic-linker", "/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2", "-o", "swap", "-z", "relro", "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4."..., "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4."..., "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4."..., "-L/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/"..., ...], [/* 26 vars */]) = 0

...

[pid  3589] vfork()                     = 3590

...

[pid  3590] execve("/usr/bin/ld", ["/usr/bin/ld", "--build-id", "--eh-frame-hdr", "-m", "elf_x86_64", "--hash-style=gnu", "-dynamic-linker", "/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2", "-o", "swap", "-z", "relro", "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4."..., "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4."..., "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4."..., "-L/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/"..., ...], [/* 27 vars */]) = 0     

...

[pid  3590] lseek(13, 4096, SEEK_SET)   = 4096
[pid  3590] read(13, ".\4@\0\0\0\0\0>\4@\0\0\0\0\0N\4@\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0"..., 4096) = 4096
[pid  3590] mmap(NULL, 1600004096, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) = 0x7f1771931000
<system comes to screeching halt>

It would appear that, as we might have suspected, it looks like ld is actually trying to anonymously mmap the entire static memory space of this array (or possibly the entire program, it's hard to tell since the rest of the program is so small, it might all fit in that extra 4096).

So that's all well and good, but why does it work when we exceed the available swap on the system? Let's turn swapoff and run strace -f again...

[pid  3618] lseek(13, 4096, SEEK_SET)   = 4096
[pid  3618] read(13, ".\4@\0\0\0\0\0>\4@\0\0\0\0\0N\4@\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0"..., 4096) = 4096
[pid  3618] mmap(NULL, 1600004096, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) = -1 ENOMEM (Cannot allocate memory)
[pid  3618] brk(0x60638000)             = 0x1046000
[pid  3618] mmap(NULL, 1600135168, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) = -1 ENOMEM (Cannot allocate memory)
[pid  3618] mmap(NULL, 134217728, PROT_NONE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS|MAP_NORESERVE, -1, 0) = 0x7fd011864000

...

Unsurprisingly, ld seems to do the same thing it tried last time, to mmap the entire space. but the system is no longer able to do that, it fails! ld tries again, and it fails again, then ld does something unexpected... it moves on with less memory.

Weird, I guess we'd better have a look at the ld code then. Drat, it doesn't do an explicit mmap. This must be coming from inside of a plain old malloc. We'll have to build ld with some debug symbols to track this down. Unfortunately, when I built bin-utils 2.21.1 the problem went away. Perhap it's been fixed in newer versions of bin-utils?

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I wanted to know, thank you! I'll do some investigations Monday, so forgive a slight delay with the reward. Indeed, "with the GNU C library, the included malloc automatically uses mmap where appropriate" which I believe is 2MB or so (I forget where I'm getting that number, forgive me). gnu.org/s/hello/manual/libc/Memory_002dmapped-I_002fO.html –  Rooke Nov 28 '11 at 3:59

I tortured tested my OpenSuse 11.4 (going for 12.1 in a week)

I have 4GiB ram + 2GiB swap and did not notice serious slow down, the system might be trashing at times, but still the compile time was short.

The longest was 6 seconds while heavy swapping.

[tester@ulises ~]$ free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:          3456       3426         30          0          4        249
-/+ buffers/cache:       3172        284
Swap:         2055       1382        672
[tester@ulises ~]$ time cc -Wall -O test2.c
test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:13:2: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘size_t’

real    0m6.501s
user    0m0.101s
sys     0m0.078s
[tester@ulises ~]$ free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:          3456       3389         67          0          5        289
-/+ buffers/cache:       3094        362
Swap:         2055       1455        599
[tester@ulises ~]$ free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:          3456       3373         82          0          4        264
-/+ buffers/cache:       3104        352
Swap:         2055       1442        612
[tester@ulises ~]$ time cc -Wall -O test2.c
test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:13:2: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘size_t’

real    0m1.122s
user    0m0.086s
sys     0m0.045s
[tester@ulises ~]$ time cc -Wall -O test2.c
test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:13:2: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘size_t’

real    0m0.095s
user    0m0.047s
sys     0m0.032s
[tester@ulises ~]$ free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:          3456       3376         79          0          4        252
-/+ buffers/cache:       3119        336
Swap:         2055       1436        618
[tester@ulises ~]$ time cc -Wall -O test2.c
test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:13:2: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘size_t’

real    0m0.641s
user    0m0.054s
sys     0m0.040s

Between running I have loaded and unloaded Virtualbox Box VM's, Eclipse, large pdf files, mi firefox alone using 800+ MiB. I didi not go the limit, otherwise many Apps would be killed by the OS. It has a preference for killing Firefox.. :-)

I also went to the extreme defining:

#define M 1048576
#define GIANT_SIZE (20000*M)

and even then nothing change significantly.

[tester@ulises ~]$ time cc -Wall -O test2.c
test2.c:7:14: warning: integer overflow in expression
test2.c:7:8: error: size of array ‘g_arr’ is negative
test2.c:7:1: warning: variably modified ‘g_arr’ at file scope
test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:13:2: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘size_t’

real    0m0.661s
user    0m0.043s
sys     0m0.031s

Edit: I re-tested using Fedora16 on a VM with 512MiB RAM and 1.5GiB swap, and things were similar except for an error message on my "maximum stress version" where 20000 megabytes were assigned to the array. The error say the array size was negative.

[ricardo@localhost ~]$ time gcc -Wall test2.c 
test2.c:7:14: warning: integer overflow in expression [-Woverflow]
test2.c:7:8: error: size of array ‘g_arr’ is negative
test2.c:7:1: warning: variably modified ‘g_arr’ at file scope [enabled by default]
test2.c: In function ‘main’:
test2.c:13:2: warning: format ‘%d’ expects argument of type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘size_t’ [-Wformat]

real    0m1.053s
user    0m0.050s
sys     0m0.137s

The same response happens in opensuse 12.1 VM. The Fedora 16 install seamed verry slow and memory hungry(during install I had to use 800MiB versus OpenSuse 512 MiB), I could not use swapoff on Fedora because it was using a lot of swap space. I had not sluggishness nor memory problems on OpenSuse 12.1 and . Both have essentially the same versions of kernel, gcc, etc. Both using stock installs with KDE as the Desktop environment

I could not reproduce you issues, Maybe is a gcc related issue. Try downloading an older version like 4.5 and see what happens

share|improve this answer

I don't observe this behavior (with Debian/Sid/AMD64 on a 8Gb desktop, gcc 4.6.2, binutils gold ld (GNU Binutils for Debian 2.22) 1.11). Here is the changed program (displaying its memory map with pmap).

#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define M 1000000
#define GIANT_SIZE (2000*M)
size_t g_arr[GIANT_SIZE];
int main( int argc, char **argv){   
  int i;
  char cmd[80];
  for(i = 0; i<10; i++){
      printf("This should be zero: %d\n",g_arr[i*1000]);
  }
  sprintf (cmd, "pmap %d", (int)getpid());
  system(cmd);
  exit(0);
}

Here is its compilation:

% time gcc -v -O big.c -o big
Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=/usr/bin/gcc-4.6.real
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/lto-wrapper
Target: x86_64-linux-gnu
Configured with: ../src/configure -v --with-pkgversion='Debian 4.6.2-4' --with-bugurl=file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.6/README.Bugs --enable-languages=c,c++,fortran,objc,obj-c++,go --prefix=/usr --program-suffix=-4.6 --enable-shared --enable-linker-build-id --with-system-zlib --libexecdir=/usr/lib --without-included-gettext --enable-threads=posix --with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.6 --libdir=/usr/lib --enable-nls --enable-clocale=gnu --enable-libstdcxx-debug --enable-libstdcxx-time=yes --enable-plugin --enable-objc-gc --with-arch-32=i586 --with-tune=generic --enable-checking=release --build=x86_64-linux-gnu --host=x86_64-linux-gnu --target=x86_64-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.6.2 (Debian 4.6.2-4) 
COLLECT_GCC_OPTIONS='-v' '-O' '-o' 'big' '-mtune=generic' '-march=x86-64'
 /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/cc1 -quiet -v -imultilib . -imultiarch x86_64-linux-gnu big.c -quiet -dumpbase big.c -mtune=generic -march=x86-64 -auxbase big -O -version -o /tmp/ccWThBP5.s
GNU C (Debian 4.6.2-4) version 4.6.2 (x86_64-linux-gnu)
    compiled by GNU C version 4.6.2, GMP version 5.0.2, MPFR version 3.1.0, MPC version 0.9
warning: MPFR header version 3.1.0 differs from library version 3.1.0-p3.
GGC heuristics: --param ggc-min-expand=100 --param ggc-min-heapsize=131072
ignoring nonexistent directory "/usr/local/include/x86_64-linux-gnu"
ignoring nonexistent directory "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/include"
#include "..." search starts here:
#include <...> search starts here:
 /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/include
 /usr/local/include
 /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/include-fixed
 /usr/include/x86_64-linux-gnu
 /usr/include
End of search list.
GNU C (Debian 4.6.2-4) version 4.6.2 (x86_64-linux-gnu)
    compiled by GNU C version 4.6.2, GMP version 5.0.2, MPFR version 3.1.0, MPC version 0.9
warning: MPFR header version 3.1.0 differs from library version 3.1.0-p3.
GGC heuristics: --param ggc-min-expand=100 --param ggc-min-heapsize=131072
Compiler executable checksum: 4b128876859f8f310615c7040fa3cb67
COLLECT_GCC_OPTIONS='-v' '-O' '-o' 'big' '-mtune=generic' '-march=x86-64'
 as --64 -o /tmp/ccm7905b.o /tmp/ccWThBP5.s
COMPILER_PATH=/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/:/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/:/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/:/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/:/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/
LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/:/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/:/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../../lib/:/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/:/lib/../lib/:/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/:/usr/lib/../lib/:/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../:/lib/:/usr/lib/
COLLECT_GCC_OPTIONS='-v' '-O' '-o' 'big' '-mtune=generic' '-march=x86-64'
 /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/collect2 --build-id --no-add-needed --eh-frame-hdr -m elf_x86_64 --hash-style=both -dynamic-linker /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 -o big /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/crt1.o /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/crti.o /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/crtbegin.o -L/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6 -L/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../x86_64-linux-gnu -L/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../../lib -L/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu -L/lib/../lib -L/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu -L/usr/lib/../lib -L/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../.. /tmp/ccm7905b.o -lgcc --as-needed -lgcc_s --no-as-needed -lc -lgcc --as-needed -lgcc_s --no-as-needed /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/crtend.o /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/crtn.o
gcc -v -O big.c -o big  0.07s user 0.01s system 90% cpu 0.089 total

and its execution:

  % time ./big
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 This should be zero: 0
 8835:   ./big
 0000000000400000      4K r-x--  /home/basile/tmp/big
 0000000000401000      4K rw---  /home/basile/tmp/big
 0000000000402000 15625000K rw---    [ anon ]
 00007f2d15a44000   1512K r-x--  /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.13.so
 00007f2d15bbe000   2048K -----  /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.13.so
 00007f2d15dbe000     16K r----  /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.13.so
 00007f2d15dc2000      4K rw---  /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc-2.13.so
 00007f2d15dc3000     20K rw---    [ anon ]
 00007f2d15dc8000    124K r-x--  /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.13.so
 00007f2d15fb4000     12K rw---    [ anon ]
 00007f2d15fe4000     12K rw---    [ anon ]
 00007f2d15fe7000      4K r----  /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.13.so
 00007f2d15fe8000      4K rw---  /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.13.so
 00007f2d15fe9000      4K rw---    [ anon ]
 00007ffff5b5b000    132K rw---    [ stack ]
 00007ffff5bff000      4K r-x--    [ anon ]
 ffffffffff600000      4K r-x--    [ anon ]
  total         15628908K
 ./big  0.00s user 0.00s system 0% cpu 0.004 total

I believe that installing a recent GCC (e.g. a GCC 4.6) with a binutils Gold linker is significant for such programs.

I don't hear any swapping involved.

share|improve this answer
    
Notice that I asked basic -O optimization. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 22 '11 at 20:57
    
But even without any optimization, the compilation and run remains nearly instantaneous. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 22 '11 at 21:12
    
Thanks for testing this, Basile. Keep in mind that I'm not as interested in the run-time characteristics as I am with why the linker decides to do certain things. Compiling this with your setting of GIANT_SIZE (2000*M) is also snappy on my box. The key is trying to set the size of the array to something just under the total swap size. Also note my binutils version is 2.21.51.0.6-6.fc15, which I believe includes the so-called gold linker. I don't know if it's actually used, though. –  Rooke Nov 22 '11 at 21:56
    
Rooke, you can add -v option to your compile&link command ` gcc HugeTest.c` and gcc will print every subprogram it runs with all options. –  osgx Nov 23 '11 at 2:36
    
The only difference I can see between Basile's linker and mine is the option '--hash-style=both'. On my fedora box it's --hash-style=gnu. I found a satisfactory explanation of what this does (see link), but I'm doubtful that has any effect. sites.google.com/site/avinesh/… –  Rooke Nov 23 '11 at 16:27

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