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I have this array (I know, technically there is no such thing as a multidimensional array in javascript) or 'object'. I want to get the value -888 like so:

    var thisPage = 1;

    var pagePos = {
        0: {
            left: '0',
            url: 'home',
        },
        1: {
            left: '-888',
            url: 'what_we_offer',
        },
        2: {
            left: '-1776',
            url: 'clients',
        },
        3: {
            left: '-2664',
            url: 'contact_us',
        }
    };

alert(pagePos[thisPage].left);

It works fine in Firefox, but not IE. Why?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
It does work in IE. Working demo. Is this your actual code? Something else is going wrong, something we're not seeing. Is there perhaps a trailing , after declaring the 3 property? Because that doesn't work very well in IE. –  David Hedlund Nov 22 '11 at 20:55
    
@DavidHedlund He didn't say what version OF IE... –  mattsven Nov 22 '11 at 20:56
    
Thanks for your reply, actually duri has it below- it's the trailing commas after the url attributes that's throwing it. Cheers. –  Inigo Nov 22 '11 at 21:01
1  
@nex: fair point. Heh, with hindsight "something we're not seeing ... perhaps a trailing comma" should've been something I wasn't seeing o_O –  David Hedlund Nov 23 '11 at 7:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is because of trailing commas after values of url attributes. You can't have comma after the last value in JSON. The correct syntax is

var pagePos = {
    0: {
        left: '0',
        url: 'home'
    },
    1: {
        left: '-888',
        url: 'what_we_offer'
    },
    2: {
        left: '-1776',
        url: 'clients'
    },
    3: {
        left: '-2664',
        url: 'contact_us'
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
You've got it! duh. Many thanks! –  Inigo Nov 22 '11 at 21:03

What if you turn it into an array of objects (since that's the way you're accessing it):

var thisPage = 1;

var pagePos = [
    {
        left: '0',
        url: 'home'
    },
    {
        left: '-888',
        url: 'what_we_offer'
    },
    {
        left: '-1776',
        url: 'clients'
    },
    {
        left: '-2664',
        url: 'contact_us'
    }
];

alert(pagePos[thisPage].left);

Also... remove the extra commas after the url properties. Some browsers are OK with them, some not.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes- it's the extra commas after the url properties! Thanks. –  Inigo Nov 22 '11 at 21:02

I can see a couple ways IE might have issues with this (it's IE, cmon'). Try changing the nature of your Array to a simple Array of objects. They'll be naturally numbered this way, by the order they're initialized.

var pagePos = [
    {
        left: '0',
        url: 'home',
    },
    {
        left: '-888',
        url: 'what_we_offer',
    },
    {
        left: '-1776',
        url: 'clients',
    },
    {
        left: '-2664',
        url: 'contact_us',
    }
];
share|improve this answer
    
Ah. Right. Better, thanks. –  Inigo Nov 22 '11 at 21:03

That's kind of a quirky way to put together an array...I'm surprised it works in any browser! Try definining pagePos like this intead:

var pagePos = [ // note: bracket!
        {
            left: '0',
            url: 'home',
        },
        {
            left: '-888',
            url: 'what_we_offer',
        },
        {
            left: '-1776',
            url: 'clients',
        },
        {
            left: '-2664',
            url: 'contact_us',
        }
    ];
share|improve this answer

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