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I'm experimenting with the use of AspectJ in some of my team's code to add statistics tracking without muddying up the main implementation but am running into some problems. What I'm trying to do is surround all calls of a method on a particular interface to be surrounded by my custom logic. For experimentation purposes I put together some code w/out using generics:

public interface Dummy {
    public void setState(String state);
    public String getState();
}
public class DummyImpl implements Dummy {
    private String state;
    public DummyImpl() { state = "default"; }
    public void setState(String state) { this.state = state; }
    public String getState() { return state; }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        DummyImpl dummy = new DummyImpl();
        dummy.setState("One");
        dummy.setState("Another");
        dummy.setState("OneMore");
        System.out.printf("Current state is %s.\n", dummy.getState());
    }
}
public aspect BoundDummy {
    void around(Dummy d): execution(void Dummy.setState(String)) && target(d) {
        String oldState = d.getState();
        proceed(d);
        System.err.printf("State has changed from \"%s\" to \"%s\".\n", oldState, d.getState());
    }
}

This has the desired effect giving output similar to: Current state is OneMore. State has changed from "default" to "One". State has changed from "One" to "Another". State has changed from "Another" to "OneMore".

Now I try and introduce generics, which is straight-forward for the interface and implementation but proves more difficult for the aspect since I can no longer use "target" and have to make it abstract (if I don't I get an error: "Only abstract aspects can have type parameters"):

public interface Dummy<T> {
    public void setState(T state);
    public T getState();
}
public class DummyImpl<T> implements Dummy<T> {
    private T state;
    public DummyImpl(T state) { this.state = state; }
    public void setState(T state) { this.state = state; }
    public T getState() { return state; }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        DummyImpl<String> dummy = new DummyImpl<String>("default");
        dummy.setState("One");
        dummy.setState("Another");
        dummy.setState("OneMore");
        System.out.printf("Current state is %s.\n", dummy.getState());
    }
}
public abstract aspect BoundDummy<T> {
    void around(Dummy<T> d): execution(void Dummy.setState(T)) && target(d) { // <-- doesn't compile due to erasure
        T oldState = d.getState();
        proceed(d);
        System.err.printf("State has changed from \"%s\" to \"%s\".\n", oldState, d.getState());
    }
}

Is there something silly that I'm doing here? Can anyone explain to me what I have to change in order to get the code to function the way it did before introducing generics?

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1 Answer 1

Well, you can do away with generics in you aspect. The compiler gives you a warning, but it works anyway (I tested):

public aspect BoundDummy {
    void around(Dummy d): execution(void Dummy.setState(*)) && target(d) {
        Object oldState = d.getState();
        proceed(d);
        System.err.printf("State has changed from \"%s\" to \"%s\".\n", oldState, d.getState());
    }
}
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