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I was doing a simple calculation to get the difference between two dates. If I was using a Date class I can do like this:

Date d1 = new GregorianCalendar(2000, 11, 31, 23, 59).getTime();

    /** Today's date */
    Date today = new Date();

    // Get msec from each, and subtract.
    long diff = today.getTime() - d1.getTime();

    System.out.println("The 21st century (up to " + today + ") is "
        + (diff / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24)) + " days old.");
  }

But I couldn't find a method like getTime() in Local date. Is there any way so I can easily get what I am trying to achieve?

I even tried to change my LocalDate object to a temporary date object like this:

 LocalDate date=new LocalDate();
    Date d=date.toDate();

but the method toDate() isnt working . i.e it says it is not recognized method.(so compile time error) but from what I can see it is in the Documentation

Thank you for your time and of course happy Thanksgiving.

share|improve this question
    
getLocalMillis() ? –  leonardoborges Nov 22 '11 at 21:20
    
I tried that one and the method is protected –  WowBow Nov 22 '11 at 21:28
    
LocalDate is meant to hold only a date - year, month, day. If you need a local date and time, use LocalDateTime instead. –  Jesper Nov 22 '11 at 21:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Days.daysBetween() is the answer.

LocalDate now = new LocalDate();
LocalDate past = now.minusDays(300);
int days = Days.daysBetween(past,now).getDays();

Never convert a LocalDate to a Java Date (two completey different beasts) if you are just dealing with dates. A Jodatime Localdate is a true "Calendar date", i.e. , a tuple of {day,month,year} (together with a Gregorian calendar specification), and has nothing to do with "physical time", with seconds, hours, etc. If you need to do dates arithmetic, stick with Localdate and you'll never need to worry about stupid bugs (timezones, DST, etc) which could arise if you dates arithmetic using java Dates.

share|improve this answer
    
I can say the simplest of all. Thanks man. –  WowBow Nov 22 '11 at 22:28

Try something like this:

      LocalDate date =  new LocalDate();

       Date utilDate = date.toDateTimeAtStartOfDay( timeZone ).toDate( );

or refer to this post

How to convert Joda LocalDate to java.util.Date?

share|improve this answer

I tested this sample code to find out the difference in days, you can find the difference as per your needs.

Please see http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/key_period.html

    LocalDate currentDate = new LocalDate();

    LocalDate previousDate = currentDate.minusDays(1);
    System.out.println(currentDate);
    System.out.println(previousDate);

    Period periodDifference = new Period(currentDate, previousDate, PeriodType.days());
    System.out.println(periodDifference);
share|improve this answer
private long diff(Calendar c1, Calendar c2) { 
  long d1 = c1.getTimeInMillis();
  long d2 = c2.getTimeInMillis();
  return ((d2 - d1) / (60*60*24*1000));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Am not using calendar. –  WowBow Nov 22 '11 at 21:32
    
Date doesn't have that functionality -- easily. Converting it to another format for this purpose is your best bet. Jesper has the other good answer. –  awm Nov 22 '11 at 21:38

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